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Discussion Starter #1
I have been, and will be driving and fine tuning the X3 rs, and Ds models over the next month putting together recipes to fit owners styles so you can get the most out of your new x3.

From just tweeking the stock equipment, to changing a few springs to fit your ride, Plus revalving to get a little more adjustment out of the shocks.

We feel the stock valving can, and should be a little more plush for the recreational owner. I tend to valve to give a wider spectrum of soft and firm. You CAN have both with these shocks to be softer in the beginning and firmer on the end stroke where you need it most.
Shoot your suspension questions to me and I will try and answer them best I can? As well as help you tweek your own vehicle to fit your style. One size (set up) does not usually fit all.

Ed
 

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Ok, you asked for it. LOL. I run mostly desert and Moab. No dunes. Car is a little harsh like you alluded. BTW, mine is the XRS. On the rear. I raised the rings on the secondary springs, (not the preload) about an inch and backed the compression dampening, high and low speed to around 1 full turn from full soft. Front I did not do anything except adjust the compression the same as the rear. It is a little plusher. Any magic tricks to these new Foxes?

Sam
 

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Ed,
We Have a new X3 DS. We are primarily Glamis Duners. We spent 2 hours with Fox and Can Am over this last weekend attempting to dial in the suspension. We are running 30" Sand Wedge paddles on rear, with Sand Wedge razors on front. We were experience an immense amount of bucking on the big woops up Oldsmobile at any speed. Fox said the suspension was set too low from the factory, and raised it 2" all the way around. The ride became stiffer and little better but still inadequate. They told me to work on tweaking the rebound on rear. I adjusted it all the way in and out In intervals with testing. STILL NO GOOD!
Fox is blaming the tires. I will add one more piece to this. I spoke with a lot of people at the RZR Fest that were running the same tires and loved them with no issues. Some did say that the valving in the shocks needed changed to improve the ride.
We have only owned LS Sand Cars until this (which ride great). Am I expecting too much?
 

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Why are people raising the ride height? I haven't messed with the crossover yet but with both high and low speed compression set to full soft, I floated through whoops at the bottom of the hill in Utah pretty well
 

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Fox was the ones who said that the shocks were set up too low. They changed several cars suspension during the week.
They say that CanAm wanted the cars lower then they originally set them up.
It was worse when I started so it did improve it.
They also readjusted the crossover rate.
 

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At stock height I was bottoming out the rear shocks really bad on my XDS last weekend in the big whoops up Comp Hill at Sand Mtn NV. It didn't matter what I did to the compression or rebound settings it would still bottom out bad. I plan to add some preload as has been mentioned next time out.
 

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At stock height I was bottoming out the rear shocks really bad on my XDS last weekend in the big whoops up Comp Hill at Sand Mtn NV. It didn't matter what I did to the compression or rebound settings it would still bottom out bad. I plan to add some preload as has been mentioned next time out.
After demo'ing the machine at sand mountain last month, my biggest complaint with the XDs was exactly this
 

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At stock height I was bottoming out the rear shocks really bad on my XDS last weekend in the big whoops up Comp Hill at Sand Mtn NV. It didn't matter what I did to the compression or rebound settings it would still bottom out bad. I plan to add some preload as has been mentioned next time out.
I had mine at original height and original factory settings (verified) plus two clicks stiffer on the low speed on the rear and didn't have any issue with bottoming out shooting Oldsmobile. The factory rebound was too loose and it was springing up quiet a bit. Two clicks tighter on the rear calmed the rebound issues.

The next day Fox set my shocks and significantly altered my ride height. All valving was set in the middle. I had to go softer a 1/2 turn on all four corners with the high speed and 3 clicks softer on the rear to get it to finally touch bottom on hard G outs.

It's weird that our identical shocks are performing that much differently. I'd be curious to know if your's and mine are shimmed the same.




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I will give it a try. As I mentioned in earlier thread, fox blamed it on the paddles I am running. What tires are you running? I should mention that on the last day I went back to the stock wheels and tires with almost the same results. (Fox is wrong)
I did no adjustments myself except for rebound on rear.
 

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30 inch Skat Extremes, but I didn't have any issues running hard in the desert with the original wheels and tires.


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The xrs my wife has bucked in the rear on steep whoops.
I didn't count the clicks, but turned in the rebound a half turn. Cured most of the bucking.
She was following me in the turbo rzr with shock work and kept plowing sand in the front.
I have never had to adjust low speed compression before, so I keep turning in both high and low until the front shocks were 1/4 turn from all the way in.
Worked pretty good except that the real was smacking now.
Adjusted rear until both high and low were all the way in.
I drove it and was bottoming out front and rear, felt like I shouldn't been able to push it harder than I did.
Really wanted to raise the ride height, but didn't dare as the front sway bar did not come with the links.
The dealer is sending me the links, but have not seen them yet.
 

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The XDS has decent suspension out of the box. However, we had one XRS in our camp at Glamis and I talked to 3 other XRS owners over the weekend and they all said it was way too soft and prone to bottoming out. Once Fox reset the ride height and crossovers on the one in our camp, it was vastly improved.


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Discussion Starter #14
Ok, you asked for it. LOL. I run mostly desert and Moab. No dunes. Car is a little harsh like you alluded. BTW, mine is the XRS. On the rear. I raised the rings on the secondary springs, (not the preload) about an inch and backed the compression dampening, high and low speed to around 1 full turn from full soft. Front I did not do anything except adjust the compression the same as the rear. It is a little plusher. Any magic tricks to these new Foxes?

Sam
Hey Sam,
For the X3 RS model.
To help everyone understand. These fox shocks have multi level bipass. What that basically means is, the shock has a progressive firmness level. As the shock is compressed, it passes through these levels. compare it to a sliding scale, softest on one side, at full extension, and gets firmer as it gets closer to the other side, that is full compression.
Well, on the rear shock stock set ride hight, it's sitting closer to the full compression side. So it is sitting in a firmer part of the compression levels.
Add the fact that the shock is sitting on the rear crossovers, witch means, at this point your using a single rate spring. The spring rate increases very quickly. Plus firm valving, all adds to a firmer, harsher ride for the recreational rider.
This set up may be just fine for some drivers!? And its not that it's wrong? But It's very aggressive and only really fits a much smaller percentage of users.

So,
We increase the rear, as well as the front ride hight to get the shock farther from the firmer levels and closer to the softer levels to start its compression stroke when your driving. And we raise the rear crossovers to allow the shock to use "more" dual rate spring travel before using single rate travel.
Rebound is increased, slowed down, to help keep the rear tires on the ground and to fly level over drop offs, jumps and other air time. But the rear will already be slower to rebound because we moved the crossovers upward. The spring rates will be less to push the the car away from earth.
And! On the rear shock, Use a 17mm wrench and open that hi/speed adjuster full counterclockwise open. And leave it full open!
Realistically, you should not us that adjuster until your low speed flathead adjuster is full closed and you still want firmer compression. At this point, you can start to turn the hispeed adjuster clockwise if desired. This adjuster will effect your initial shock movement, so your softer ride over the chop will go south quickly!
Run your low speed screwdriver adjuster 1/4 turn from full closed for dunes, less for desert driving.

The front crossovers go "down". This will increase car stability as the single rate spring will engage sooner and hold the front more level and reduce diving.
It will also allow you to run softer settings over the chop.
Front rebound must be increased because now your front spring rates are pushing those shock to extend faster!
Front hispeed, full open, then 1/4 turn closed
Front low speed, full closed 1/4 open

Questions?
 

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Ed, I'm having a hard time with the " leave the high speed fully open "

With that open how would you stop or slow down G ours?

Then you shouldn't need high speed dampening until you have slow speed fully closed ? If these are speed based and not zone based then when the shock compresses quickly such as a G out or a jump you virtually have no dampening .

I have not seen any setup nor heard of anyone including the manual say that.

Tim
 

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Hey Sam,
For the X3 RS model.
To help everyone understand. These fox shocks have multi level bipass. What that basically means is, the shock has a progressive firmness level. As the shock is compressed, it passes through these levels. compare it to a sliding scale, softest on one side, at full extension, and gets firmer as it gets closer to the other side, that is full compression.
Well, on the rear shock stock set ride hight, it's sitting closer to the full compression side. So it is sitting in a firmer part of the compression levels.
Add the fact that the shock is sitting on the rear crossovers, witch means, at this point your using a single rate spring. The spring rate increases very quickly. Plus firm valving, all adds to a firmer, harsher ride for the recreational rider.
This set up may be just fine for some drivers!? And its not that it's wrong? But It's very aggressive and only really fits a much smaller percentage of users.

So,
We increase the rear, as well as the front ride hight to get the shock farther from the firmer levels and closer to the softer levels to start its compression stroke when your driving. And we raise the rear crossovers to allow the shock to use "more" dual rate spring travel before using single rate travel.
Rebound is increased, slowed down, to help keep the rear tires on the ground and to fly level over drop offs, jumps and other air time. But the rear will already be slower to rebound because we moved the crossovers upward. The spring rates will be less to push the the car away from earth.
And! On the rear shock, Use a 17mm wrench and open that hi/speed adjuster full counterclockwise open. And leave it full open!
Realistically, you should not us that adjuster until your low speed flathead adjuster is full closed and you still want firmer compression. At this point, you can start to turn the hispeed adjuster clockwise if desired. This adjuster will effect your initial shock movement, so your softer ride over the chop will go south quickly!
Run your low speed screwdriver adjuster 1/4 turn from full closed for dunes, less for desert driving.

The front crossovers go "down". This will increase car stability as the single rate spring will engage sooner and hold the front more level and reduce diving.
It will also allow you to run softer settings over the chop.
Front rebound must be increased because now your front spring rates are pushing those shock to extend faster!
Front hispeed, full open, then 1/4 turn closed
Front low speed, full closed 1/4 open

Questions?
How much more preload?? Rebound setting??
Thx much
 

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For the X3 RS model.
To help everyone understand. These fox shocks have multi level bipass. What that basically means is, the shock has a progressive firmness level. As the shock is compressed, it passes through these levels. compare it to a sliding scale, softest on one side, at full extension, and gets firmer as it gets closer to the other side, that is full compression
See the attached picture. Zoom in for details.

20160916_172130.jpg
 

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Ride height is critical in the shock setup of the XRS those internal bypass shocks are pretty picky on where they want to be setup. We've had really good success setting them up on other vehicles and look forward to tuning all the X3 models.
We just got all of the springs rated for all of the models and we're working on more.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Ed, I'm having a hard time with the " leave the high speed fully open "

With that open how would you stop or slow down G ours?

Then you shouldn't need high speed dampening until you have slow speed fully closed ? If these are speed based and not zone based then when the shock compresses quickly such as a G out or a jump you virtually have no dampening .

I have not seen any setup nor heard of anyone including the manual say that.

Tim
That hi/speed adjustment only accounts for less than 15 percent of your dampening in that area. Those adjusters are for "fine tuning". The bulk of the work is controlled by the main piston valving. So there is no "virtually no dampening" action happening from this adjuster being open full.

Plus you have the action of the bipass ports.
And shock position adding to this formula. Lot going on!

We can compare the hi/speed adjuster to the top pad on the bed you sleep on. It helps adjust the initial firmness, that is the very beginning movement of the shock.

Do you like a really firm pad?? Or a softer plusher one? This helps your entry into the main bed mattress. The softer you run the top pad, the firmer you can run the bottom mattress (for g-out) since you have a soft entry

Now, if your the kid that likes to hi dive launch yourself into that bed?? Or gets up on the tall bedroom furniture, And jumps on that bed? You going to blow through that soft pad and carry lots of speed into that main mattress! And bottom outs will happen more often. So you would prefer the all around firmer top pad( hi/speed). And firmer bottom mattress( low-speed ) adjustments.

If your a different driver that does not need this firm of set up?? If Your more smooth and fast and flow, pick your lines? Then why suffer with a firmer pad? Softer and smooth is good!
From my experiance, "most" drivers do not require the firmest set up and are much more happy with the plusher ride, that means a softer pad and but still firm mattress!
Especially if moma and or the kids are in the car. Everyone has thier own style of driving, and those styles require sometimes hugely different shock set ups. One way is not the only way.
It's up to the driver to decide what they need?
That way the tuner can more adequately set up their suspension to fit that style.
 
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