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Needing to work on the alignment for my new to me Maverick and after reading all the different ways to do it, I thought back to my sprint car crew days. Simple answer, USE TOE PLATES! Easy solution especially if you ride through the rough stuff like we do and need to check it often. Cheap simple solution you can find on line.
 

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LOL, after reading all the string methods and other stuff I wasn't sure anybody knew what they were since they are mostly used by dirt track racers. Just trying to contribute instead of asking dumb questions this time.
 

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I find it is very easy to just use a tape measure. Measure the front inside sidewall of the tires halfway up and then measure the rear of the tires the same way. Should be a difference of about 1/4". Simple, one person job. These things are not high speed track cars. A 1/16" or 1/8" one way or the other will not matter.
 

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I find it is very easy to just use a tape measure. Measure the front inside sidewall of the tires halfway up and then measure the rear of the tires the same way. Should be a difference of about 1/4". Simple, one person job. These things are not high speed track cars. A 1/16" or 1/8" one way or the other will not matter.
Having the toe set correctly will make the handling better in the dirt, but those if us that use them in pavement even more so its critical they have the correct toe front and rear( if you have aftermarket rods)

For 60 dollars you can make the job easier,simpler and accurate.

1/8 to 1/4 in at the front and zero at the rear. Tim

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Seems like overkill for such a simple job where access to the tires is not restricted by bodywork. But hey, it's only money! LOL
 

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Seems like overkill for such a simple job where access to the tires is not restricted by bodywork. But hey, it's only money! LOL

You own a SXS and you think 60 bucks is a lot of money to spend on it?

The right tools make the job easier, that's why we use power tools and not hand tools, while a hand saw will cut a power saw makes it easier. A wrench may turn a bolt or nut a Milwaukee battery powered ratchet makes it easier and more efficient. A screw driver will turn a screw gun but a screw makes it easier.

I know I like having the right tool to do the job.

Tim
 

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You own a SXS and you think 60 bucks is a lot of money to spend on it?

The right tools make the job easier, that's why we use power tools and not hand tools, while a hand saw will cut a power saw makes it easier. A wrench may turn a bolt or nut a Milwaukee battery powered ratchet makes it easier and more efficient. A screw driver will turn a screw gun but a screw makes it easier.

I know I like having the right tool to do the job.

Tim
and boy does Tim know what a tool is, he sees one in the mirror every day.
 

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It's not about the money. I have lot's of tools. More than most, I'll wager. But that is another story. (Hint. Screen name). All we are doing here is measuring from the inside of one sidewall of a tire to the inside sidewall of the other tire. That can be done easily on a SXS. Why complicate it by putting two pieces of metal against the sidewalls and measuring the metal pieces? It just complicates it and adds no value. That is all I am saying.
 

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I suspect you're in a very small minority thinking the two plates and a tape measure are complicated.

At my skill level it's quite simple to use the system but everyone has a different skill level.

Tim
 

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Can you use your highly superior skill level to tell me why you want to turn a screwgun with a screwdriver? You said screws make it easier. Please explain.
 

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I have tried both, and I will tell you the plate kit is worth the 60$. Its not only easier, but more accurate. The problem with measuring the sidewalls is that most of use have aggressive tires with sidewall tread so its not very accurate measuring sidewall to sidewall with different sized lugs sticking out. But maybe you have an alignment rack in your shop since you wager you have more tools than I do.
 

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Can you use your highly superior skill level to tell me why you want to turn a screwgun with a screwdriver? You said screws make it easier. Please explain.
I will confess I fancy myself a good teacher, but at your level, you're beyond my ability to help if you cant use toe plates. Tim
 

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What did you set your toe to. I just picked up a 19 64” turbo r and it’s toe is out bad. I have a alignment rack in my shop and used spec’s for a Toyota Camry. We zeroed the toe but was wondering if it need to be toed out just a little. Mostly ride in sand.


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What did you set your toe to. I just picked up a 19 64” turbo r and it’s toe is out bad. I have a alignment rack in my shop and used spec’s for a Toyota Camry. We zeroed the toe but was wondering if it need to be toed out just a little. Mostly ride in sand.


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Toe in the front 1/8 to 1/4. Then zero the rear.

While you may find BRP says toe out on front the car will handle best with toe in. No offroad racer uses toe in. That spec works best in the dirt, even hard pack and pavement.

Tim
 
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