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Has anyone put a thermostat delete kit on your bike? What's the pros/cons, does it run cooler, take longer to warm up, is it ok to use? Thx.
 

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not recommended....the engine will not warm up enough in cooler weather and will reduce power output unless it sees the engine at operating temps....
 

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not recommended....the engine will not warm up enough in cooler weather and will reduce power output unless it sees the engine at operating temps....
Does it only reduce the power output after it senses the lower temperature for a while? The reason I ask is because we have full access immediately at start up and the engine is 'cold". So if it didn't warm up after 10-15 minutes of use is that when it would reduce power?
 

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Another thing to consider is all your seals, gaskets and rings are designed to seal properly at or above a certain temp. Therefor is the engine does not heat up enough it can cause gasket and seal failures.
 

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I put the fan override from Arcticbomb in mine. It is nice to be able to turn the fan on when moving slow, but when the switch is off it works off the thermostat like the factory made it to. It's another way to go if you want to improve on cooling.
 

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Does it only reduce the power output after it senses the lower temperature for a while? The reason I ask is because we have full access immediately at start up and the engine is 'cold". So if it didn't warm up after 10-15 minutes of use is that when it would reduce power?
From what I am told the engine reduces power output until the temperature reaches at least 2 bars....not sure if this is true or not but based on all of the safety features built into the motor, I would believe it.

Today's engines actually run better when at temperatures around 195-205 (water temp). You get a more complete burn when the engine is at full operating temperature. Cooler isn't necessarily better.....Also constant cycling of temperatures are not good on an engine. The various metals will expand and contract at different rates and could (i.e. aluminum reacts much quicker than steel) potentially cause issues. Same goes for all of the seals.....
 
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From what I am told the engine reduces power output until the temperature reaches at least 2 bars....not sure if this is true or not but based on all of the safety features built into the motor, I would believe it.

Today's engines actually run better when at temperatures around 195-205 (water temp). You get a more complete burn when the engine is at full operating temperature. Cooler isn't necessarily better.....Also constant cycling of temperatures are not good on an engine. The various metals will expand and contract at different rates and could (i.e. aluminum reacts much quicker than steel) potentially cause issues. Same goes for all of the seals.....
Makes sense. I know I was surprised to see that on my F-150 the transmission coolant temperature was running 40 degrees warmer than on my previous truck. When I spoke with a Ford tech about it, he said the design of the truck actually circulated the transmission coolant through the engine block (or something like that) to warm it to approximately the same temp as the engine coolant because the transmission coolant performed better at a higher temp. So both the engine coolant and the transmission coolant are right around that 200 degree mark after operating for a while.
 

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most fuel injection systems use a intake temp sensor. the ecu richens the mixture at idle when cold until it warms up. and the thermostat also helps the engine run cooler. allow's the coolant longer to cool in the radiator.











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Makes sense. I know I was surprised to see that on my F-150 the transmission coolant temperature was running 40 degrees warmer than on my previous truck. When I spoke with a Ford tech about it, he said the design of the truck actually circulated the transmission coolant through the engine block (or something like that) to warm it to approximately the same temp as the engine coolant because the transmission coolant performed better at a higher temp. So both the engine coolant and the transmission coolant are right around that 200 degree mark after operating for a while.
There are many factors when talking about removing an engine thermostat. That results and things that it may cause the engine to do is a pretty good size list. Long term, overcooling can be just as detrimental to your engine as overheating can in a short amount of time. When you're running too cold, the engine builds up carbon And reduces the engines ability to remain properly lubricated over the long term. It's not good for the Rings. The expansion rate of course is changed for the piston and cylinder walls when you're running too cold all the time, and believe it or not, on a hot summer day you can actually overheat by not using a thermostat because the thermostat is what slows the water down to actually absorb heat from the engine block and cylinder walls to carry it away to the radiator.

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