Can-Am Maverick Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My son was out ripping around in about 4" of snow. Everything came to a stop when his belt splattered. Turned snow was sucked into the CVT cover and got the belt wet. The CVT cover got wrecked when the belt let go as well. I guess he is going to have to find some kind of a Frogskin to put over the intake.
He hasn't got much riding in with this machine, it was down for a month in prime riding season when the trans destroyed...the bolts that hold the trans to the engine came loose and lost the oil. Maverick trans was back ordered so he has a Commander trans now.
Wicked machine but he sure is having some bad luck!
Has anybody done anything with their CVT intakes to keep the snow out? They are not set up like my Commander..I've had no trouble with snow getting pulled in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,638 Posts
I think the guys back east who ride a lot in mud and snow typically snorkel their machines from the get go. There's a write up on here about a DIY snorkel that you can do
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,381 Posts
I would suggest disconnecting the air inlet under the steering column so it draws from inside the cab instead of outside. If you get a lot of snow in the cab, sneak into the house and steal a pair of the wife's panty hoes and cut the foot off of one leg. Spray it with some Scotchguard or similar water repellant spray and then slip it over the inlet under the steering column and zip tie it on. This should cut down the chances of ingesting enough snow to pretty much nothing.......

Now, with that said.....heat is what destroys belts.....typically, a wet belt will just slip until the clutches dry off and don't generally make enough heat when they are wet to cause any harm unless you continue to thrash on it while it is slipping. So the problem may of actually been just the opposite....the snow may have packed up and blocked the CVT air intake and caused the belt to overheat....if this happened than the suggestion above would have prevented that as well.....


Oh and...welcome to the forum!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Hey, id blown a belt i under a hundred miles on mine and im certain it was from sucking in snow. When your snow riding its really hard to tell if your spinning your tires or your belt haha. Ive put a snorkel on mine now. Hopefully it will be better. If not id planned on using a pod filter on the clutch intake with a pre filter for snow riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,621 Posts
I would suggest disconnecting the air inlet under the steering column so it draws from inside the cab instead of outside. If you get a lot of snow in the cab, sneak into the house and steal a pair of the wife's panty hoes and cut the foot off of one leg. Spray it with some Scotchguard or similar water repellant spray and then slip it over the inlet under the steering column and zip tie it on. This should cut down the chances of ingesting enough snow to pretty much nothing.......

Now, with that said.....heat is what destroys belts.....typically, a wet belt will just slip until the clutches dry off and don't generally make enough heat when they are wet to cause any harm unless you continue to thrash on it while it is slipping. So the problem may of actually been just the opposite....the snow may have packed up and blocked the CVT air intake and caused the belt to overheat....if this happened than the suggestion above would have prevented that as well.....


Oh and...welcome to the forum!
These are the kind of things only your snow birds need to know about
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,381 Posts
You never know where or when you might be somewhere that gets snow. Good info to have in the back of your mind just in case.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top