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yes sir...just make sure you turn the back of the secondary until roller is past the next helix arm. you must rotate or clock the secondary...if its correct you'll probably need a 2nd set of hands while rotating the sheeve and getting the rollers into the helix.
Just trying to figure things out. I went from hole 4 (stock) to hole 6 based on epi's recommendations and gained 4-500rpm. If 6 is less pressure than 4 how could that happen? I rotated the clutch to the left (counter clockwise) and the helix to the right (clockwise) to get into position. Also, I had marked both sides of the clutch before disassembly but marks didn't line up after however both sides stamped arrows did. Are you 100% sure on how the numbering works? I only ask because that is what EPI told me and my rpm increased by doing so and there seems to be a lot of different opinions. Thanks in advance.
 

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I went from 4 to 5 and my rpms also increased...u hear sp many opinions it's hard to tell....all I know is clutching seems better to me in hole 5
 

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Just trying to figure things out. I went from hole 4 (stock) to hole 6 based on epi's recommendations and gained 4-500rpm. If 6 is less pressure than 4 how could that happen? I rotated the clutch to the left (counter clockwise) and the helix to the right (clockwise) to get into position. Also, I had marked both sides of the clutch before disassembly but marks didn't line up after however both sides stamped arrows did. Are you 100% sure on how the numbering works? I only ask because that is what EPI told me and my rpm increased by doing so and there seems to be a lot of different opinions. Thanks in advance.
I'm sharing the info I got from the race team and thru my own testing. Personally I never seen a change in shiftout that considerable. 100-200 at most. I've moved from the stock spring but with the heavier spring the clocking is still similar with the same difference in the numbering. I'f I remember i was rotating the backside of the clutch (with secondary facing down in vice) clockwise to get to the next helix arm.

I have a extra stock secondary so if i get a chance later i'll review.

if you take the number out of the equation it comes down to difficulty when clocking. If its more difficult to clock than its the stiffer position. The spring is wound more tightly...
 

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Just trying to figure things out. I went from hole 4 (stock) to hole 6 based on epi's recommendations and gained 4-500rpm. If 6 is less pressure than 4 how could that happen? I rotated the clutch to the left (counter clockwise) and the helix to the right (clockwise) to get into position. Also, I had marked both sides of the clutch before disassembly but marks didn't line up after however both sides stamped arrows did. Are you 100% sure on how the numbering works? I only ask because that is what EPI told me and my rpm increased by doing so and there seems to be a lot of different opinions. Thanks in advance.
I'm sharing the info I got from the race team and thru my own testing. Personally I never seen a change in shiftout that considerable. 100-200 at most. I've moved from the stock spring but with the heavier spring the clocking is still similar with the same difference in the numbering. I'f I remember i was rotating the backside of the clutch (with secondary facing down in vice) clockwise to get to the next helix arm.

I have a extra stock secondary so if i get a chance later i'll review.

if you take the number out of the equation it comes down to difficulty when clocking. If its more difficult to clock than its the stiffer position. The spring is wound more tightly...
If you get a chance that would be great. I’m pretty sure 6 is more tension than 4, but like you I just got information from epi which I assumed to be credible.
 

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So got a chance to look at my 17 xrs secondary. It came stock in hole #4. This secondary didn't have numbers but I used my 18 secondary to write the numbers in sharpie. I use the alba tools so helix is down in the vice so you'll be clocking the secondary clockwise. For each hole i have a photo of the spring in the hole and a photo looking up at the relationship of roller and helix arm. if you clock clockwise than as soon as the roller is past helix arm that is where it's supposed to go. If you look at 1 & 5 you could possibly He-man the roller to the next helix arm and potentially make 1 and 5 stiffer than say 3...it really wasn't designed for that but may work...this only applies to the stock spring...aftermarket and different can-am springs have different hole positions and tensions... I understand there are different opinions on what does what and I say if you find what works for you than go with it.

here's what i originally wrote and holds pretty accurate from what i saw with the exception on 6 and 2 are pretty close...maybe even 2 more than 6...

The holes on the secondary do not go in order of stiffness. not as easy as 1-6.....hole 1 and 5 are about the same....then order to get the most stiff setting is: P.6, P.2, P.4 , P.3 is the most stiff. You must clock the spring (turn the secondary half forward so the helix leg is past the roller. You'll will see on P.3 you'll need a second person...

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I not sure if people are missing it, but the helix is supposed to go back to the same spot it came out of, putting a index mark of where you started, helix and hub, so the only thing that is adjusted is the spring index position. Then, you must twist the helix to get back to the original position.
Yes, if the spring position is moved approximately 120 degrees, it may look like you just bolt it in there, but you then just skipped the whole reason of adding tension through the hole positions.
 

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yes more tension means you need to twist it more....
 

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I not sure if people are missing it, but the helix is supposed to go back to the same spot it came out of, putting a index mark of where you started, helix and hub, so the only thing that is adjusted is the spring index position. Then, you must twist the helix to get back to the original position.
Yes, if the spring position is moved approximately 120 degrees, it may look like you just bolt it in there, but you then just skipped the whole reason of adding tension through the hole positions.
. Based on your post, are you implying that there is more than Just clocking past the roller as shown in the previous pics? I do know when I changed mine from 4 to 6 (assuming it was tighter) the two clutch half’s do not line up the same. However, both arrows match perfectly where as before they were off the same as my original marks (imade with a sharpie)are now.
 

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Sorry for the old thread bump here, but I am curious on this again. Wadmaster has posted some really good pictures. I wonder if 5 is supposed to be clocked all the way to the next helix leg making is stiffer than 3? I am in 4 now and would like a little change, trying to decide where to go with it.
 

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Hey I’d like to update my old posts on here, I’ve learned a bit since I posted about the clocking of the hole position.

Wherever you want to put you’re secondary spring, what hole position, you then only twist it to get the leg over the next roller. The helix doesn’t go back to the original location.

Adam/ Airdam explained this in a different post... you can then vary the spring preload between amounts of degrees. As in starting and clocked position...

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Mike at Aftermarket Assasins helped me out when I was playing around getting my clutch setup with his kit...
 

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different springs have the tabs in different locations
so this chart is only good for the spring you used
and every spring acts different when twisted
thoes number on the chart dont help much
the only number that actually matters is the breakaway lbs
so the tension is measured by the brakaway test
it is the lbs it takes to start to rotate the movable shieve
and most use a average by pulling it a few inches and the watch the scale
then release it slowly again watching the scale

here is one video i found

not the best but, you will get the idea
usually you need at least 20lbs, the more HP the more preload needed to keep from over shifting
 

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Is this something I should adjust for altitude? I bought mine in KY but ride at 9000ft in CO. My XRS feels fine, but I'm only revving out to 75-7700 RPMS around 50-60mph. Or is this only for bottom end which seems to feel fine to me.

Derek
 

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I ordered up an //Airdam kit with new helix and primary and secondary springs. He uses a compression spring so you don’t have to deal with trying to mess with clocking the secondary torsional spring. It was much more convenient when going back together. Initial test was positive. Will be riding this weekend to see. On the 35” Roxxzillas engagement was much smoother.


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