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I talked to EPi this morning and they confirmed that I have the right part number and they pulled one from the shelf and it measures 1 7/8 from first thread to point just like mine. Hmmmm why are others 1/2" longer or (2 1/2- 5ths longer)
 

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I talked to EPi this morning and they confirmed that I have the right part number and they pulled one from the shelf and it measures 1 7/8 from first thread to point just like mine. Hmmmm why are others 1/2" longer or (2 1/2- 5ths longer)
Dont ask why the Amazon guy gave you a shorter one, just be happy with the length you were given. You could Have ended up like Tim and come up 6/5ths short all the time and insist you have a sticker outer but in reality It’s a bleeding hatchet wound.
 

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Discussion Starter #125
Ben had a guy who cut it with a die grinder long ways. Just a thin cut, the pressure from the tool being logged in and the heat from the cutter made it shatter. Didn’t get near crank. Guy worked at a machine shop and knew his stuff . (My understanding of it). Bens ordering me parts and gonna put it all back together with upgrades (he knows his stuff).
257762
257763
 

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Thanks for the update! Been following, I've never had this happen but have some real doo doo happen to me. I think you and I have the same kind of luck. I had just done my clutch when I saw your first post and was extremely happy it did not happen to me.
 

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Well I have to jump in. I had an old Teryx clutch tool and I took it over to compare to Mega's X3 clutch tool. Yes, we compared tools. Mine was longer and definitely had more 'girth'. I wound up cutting about an inch off my tool so it wasn't longer than Mega's and after applying a dab of 'lube' to the tip it removed my clutch and the neighbors X3 clutch with no problem.
 

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the lube is for the threads and for the tool to spin on in the crank
 

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What makes grease or water so effective at helping to pop the clutch I think is they are both essentially liquids so they don't compress like a gas. If you put a liquid at the bottom of the hole and then run the bolt tip in it will equally spread the compression 'load" around the point of 'impact' and be more effective at pushing out the clutch.
 

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you still need to test it at sand mnt when your done. Le us know the final $$$$ once complete, guessing $1500
 

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also where is the removed tool pic?
 
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What makes grease or water so effective at helping to pop the clutch I think is they are both essentially liquids so they don't compress like a gas. If you put a liquid at the bottom of the hole and then run the bolt tip in it will equally spread the compression 'load" around the point of 'impact' and be more effective at pushing out the clutch.

grease on the tip of the puller, or on the threads simply act as a lubricant to keep bare metal from having so much friction against each other. if you use a puller repeatedly like a mod shop or someone who takes their clutch off often you can see the tip of the puller that pushes against the bottom of the bore in the crank, the tip of the puller will get shiny silver and at some point begin to shear the steel off the end of the puller. You can see gouging and smearing of the metal on the tip of the puller. Grease on the tip simply reduces the friction from the two metal surfaces to help aid in allowing the puller to spin easier, and hopefully getting the clutch off easier.

tilting the machine up on its side, and filling the hole with water or grease, and using teflon on the threads creates a hydraulic effect, as the puller is driven in, the water or grease inside the clutch will compress, forcing the clutch off the crank. this happens from high pressure as the water or grease is compressed.
 

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grease on the tip of the puller, or on the threads simply act as a lubricant to keep bare metal from having so much friction against each other. if you use a puller repeatedly like a mod shop or someone who takes their clutch off often you can see the tip of the puller that pushes against the bottom of the bore in the crank, the tip of the puller will get shiny silver and at some point begin to shear the steel off the end of the puller. You can see gouging and smearing of the metal on the tip of the puller. Grease on the tip simply reduces the friction from the two metal surfaces to help aid in allowing the puller to spin easier, and hopefully getting the clutch off easier.

tilting the machine up on its side, and filling the hole with water or grease, and using teflon on the threads creates a hydraulic effect, as the puller is driven in, the water or grease inside the clutch will compress, forcing the clutch off the crank. this happens from high pressure as the water or grease is compressed.

Are you saying the pressure against the crank pushing back is greater than 1 to 1 like in a master cylinder?

I am curious because I would suspect its no more than 1 to 1 since the surfaces are likely very similar in surface area?

Its my understanding and I am no engineer that the hydraulic force is created when a small bore is pushing against a larger surface area.

I am just trying to picture how that works. I suspect that the extra effort results from an almost zero friction as just the threads are the only friction reducing force as the tip is pressing against grease or water.

Just trying to learn not question your knowledge.

Tim
 

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Ben had a guy who cut it with a die grinder long ways. Just a thin cut, the pressure from the tool being logged in and the heat from the cutter made it shatter. Didn’t get near crank. Guy worked at a machine shop and knew his stuff . (My understanding of it). Bens ordering me parts and gonna put it all back together with upgrades (he knows his stuff). View attachment 257762 View attachment 257763
Still wondering what brand of tool it was?
 

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Just for general information: water or grease does not compress!
I it would, it would act like a spring, it does not. It simply transmits force.
The water or grease trick works because you are forcing a small plunger in to a larger cavity displacing the water or grease; the water or grease builds up pressure against the surface of the shaft end.
The larger surface area of the shaft end, compared to the smaller surface area of the plunger (tool end) is the force multiplier.
 

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Just for general information: water or grease does not compress!
I it would, it would act like a spring, it does not. It simply transmits force.
The water or grease trick works because you are forcing a small plunger in to a larger cavity displacing the water or grease; the water or grease builds up pressure against the surface of the shaft end.
The larger surface area of the shaft end, compared to the smaller surface area of the plunger (tool end) is the force multiplier.
So there is a hydraulic force because the crankshaft area is larger than the tip of the tool. Thanks! Tim
 

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I just bought a full floated clutch kit from mgrotel. Zero issues. Set my springs and clutching up before sending it out. Dudes a straight shooter in my book. Sent him a shit ton of loot for it without even knowing the guy.

I did my 2 days of reading before I got it seeing I’ve never messed with A clutch like this before. Tried removal tool and impact for first attempt. No success. Put 6 pumps of grease in the hole. Could feel the pressure putting the tool back in. Damn near popped off instantly.
 
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