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We where beating our way through 8-10” of snow and drifts. Trying to get the stink of the house of us. Still power sawing trees down after Fiona. Wheels spinning all day. Had the winch spooled out a couple of times towing a rzr backwards. Drifts coming through the side window like someone throwing shovel fulls in the cab. The bread maker never complained once god love er. It rode like a tank couldn’t see the rear springs. No cut axle boots. Only one passenger and 800 pounds of ice perhaps. All in all a glorious day in the woods. I’m glad you guys think the engines ok that’s a huge relief.
 

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It was on my 2000 Powerstroke. We were running in 3-4ft of powder with the snow plowing over the hood. Everything had snow on it including the engine thats why the heater would only blow cold air. Having a 6 speed manual transmission tends to keep everything cooler under the truck. Auto would probably help warm things up some.
Keith you're a pretty mechanical guy, that's clear from your build and I've seen it first hand on the trail, but that explanation doesn't make sense mechanically speaking.

The engine will always be warm enough to melt snow on it.

The internal temp to the engine is regulated by the thermostat, not external temps. While thay may help lower coolant temps the coolant temp is still not going to be ice cold especially in a diesel.

A diesel uses internal pressure and thereby heat at the cylinder to ignite the fuel. Clearly very high cylinder pressure and temperatures.


EGT's on a diesel are typically 1500 and above. The cylinder temperatures are over 1000 degrees to ignite the fuel properly.

Pretty warm and without them the diesel doesn't ignite.

Just saying. The T stat is the most likley culprit not snow on the engine. Just saying.

Tim

No intention to high jack Paddy's awesome thread..but.. I have to disagree with alot of what you're saying, Tim... It is indeed true that diesels will run a lot colder in colder ambient Temps when not under heavy loads... Much heavier and thicker block, bigger rods, bigger cams, bigger intake/more air, more oil, more coolant, generally no throttle body.. All of it does add up and makes it much harder for a diesel to maintain the ~200f temps that it so adores.. I do agree with tighter tolerances, friction, combustion, but it's on such a different scale. Idling temp comparison diesel to gas is a world of difference. In 10degree ambient temps, it will take ~35 minutes for a diesel to reach ~130f ECT, even at high idle. In negative temps, unless you're pushing higher rpms(let's not split i6 and v8 diesels here), you won't see 200f ECT for long. Cruising at lower speeds and rpms you will be lucky to float around 180 and never open the t-stat.... The block stays MUCH cooler than a gas ICE at this range, which is why it is recommended to have a grille cover if you want above 65f heat from the core...

Also... If you're seeing 1500f EGTs in your diesel regularly and you're not flowing 100mm3 through that injection pump, you might want to downshift or lock out overdrive... 😆🤯
 

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No intention to high jack Paddy's awesome thread..but.. I have to disagree with alot of what you're saying, Tim... It is indeed true that diesels will run a lot colder in colder ambient Temps when not under heavy loads... Much heavier and thicker block, bigger rods, bigger cams, bigger intake/more air, more oil, more coolant, generally no throttle body.. All of it does add up and makes it much harder for a diesel to maintain the ~200f temps that it so adores.. I do agree with tighter tolerances, friction, combustion, but it's on such a different scale. Idling temp comparison diesel to gas is a world of difference. In 10degree ambient temps, it will take ~35 minutes for a diesel to reach ~130f ECT, even at high idle. In negative temps, unless you're pushing higher rpms(let's not split i6 and v8 diesels here), you won't see 200f ECT for long. Cruising at lower speeds and rpms you will be lucky to float around 180 and never open the t-stat.... The block stays MUCH cooler than a gas ICE at this range, which is why it is recommended to have a grille cover if you want above 65f heat from the core...

Also... If you're seeing 1500f EGTs in your diesel regularly and you're not flowing 100mm3 through that injection pump, you might want to downshift or lock out overdrive... 😆🤯
So the heater will blow ice cold ?

The engine can't melt snow?


I grew up in Michigan son of a trucking owner operator. Nephew of 2 owner operators grandson of a heavy diesel mechanic at Great Lakes steel.

Been around a diesel to two in my day.

Have had no less than 7 diesel trucks never had my heater blow ice cold from ambient temps.


Never have I seen a heater working properly blow ice cold, have you?

Tim
 
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So the heater will blow ice cold ?

The engine can't melt snow?


I grew up in Michigan son of a trucking owner operator. Nephew of 2 owner operators grandson of a heavy diesel mechanic at Great Lakes steel.

Been around a diesel to two in my day.

Have had no less than 7 diesel trucks never had my heater blow ice cold from ambient temps.


Never have I seen a heater working properly blow ice cold, have you?

Tim
No Sir, I have not. LOL

That would no longer be a heater, that'd be air conditioning 😂

I do agree, if he was getting ice cold heat(?!), its heater core or possibly tstat related, as you said... I interpreted your post as downplaying the (fact) that diesel trucks do suffer from a not-so-comfortable-at-times in cab heat issue. And the 1500f egt statement made my piston soft.

We have a dump truck with something faulty in the blend door actuator. Have the actuator removed, manually turn the thermostat knob on it to a sweet spot to get some medicore heat.. Irrelevance.

Paddy and his better half don't give a hoot about how hot the cab isn't...! Fascinating ride
 
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No Sir, I have not. LOL

That would no longer be a heater, that'd be air conditioning 😂

I do agree, if he was getting ice cold heat(?!), its heater core or possibly tstat related, as you said... I interpreted your post as downplaying the (fact) that diesel trucks do suffer from a not-so-comfortable-at-times in cab heat issue. And the 1500f egt statement made my piston soft.

We have a dump truck with something faulty in the blend door actuator. Have the actuator removed, manually turn the thstat knob on it to a sweet spot to get some medicore heat.. Irrelevance.

Paddy and his better half don't give a hoot about how hot the cab isn't...! Fascinating ride
The 1500 degrees was more of a " it can hit 1500"

I have not had a 7.3 in quite a few years but I think 1100 EGT was normal IIRC.

My point on that was it should melt snow on the engine.

Great point on the blend door. I didn't consider that, very likely with Ford and blend door actuators breaking so common. I've had numerous break on me over the years, I should have thought of that.
Tim
 
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Keith you're a pretty mechanical guy, that's clear from your build and I've seen it first hand on the trail, but that explanation doesn't make sense mechanically speaking.

The engine will always be warm enough to melt snow on it.

The internal temp to the engine is regulated by the thermostat, not external temps. While thay may help lower coolant temps the coolant temp is still not going to be ice cold especially in a diesel.

A diesel uses internal pressure and thereby heat at the cylinder to ignite the fuel. Clearly very high cylinder pressure and temperatures.


EGT's on a diesel are typically 1500 and above. The cylinder temperatures are over 1000 degrees to ignite the fuel properly.

Pretty warm and without them the diesel doesn't ignite.

Just saying. The T stat is the most likley culprit not snow on the engine. Just saying.

Tim
There was some warmth to the heater (not ice cold) definitely warmer than the outside temperature but felt ice cold to me as I was freezing my ass off. My 2002 Dodge Cummins even did it worse when I was driving from Vegas temp of 65 to North Dakata when I hit freezing fog with temps in the -10 the heater couldn't keep the window defrosted and I would have to stop and rev the engine for 30 minutes to build up enough heat to thaw out the front window enough to see. I even put a raincoat in front of the radiator that froze solid but didn't seem to help much. I think because the radiator is so big that it just cools the water so fast the engine water temp heat is reduced extremely fast not leaving much heat to make the heater feel warm enough. The Semi I was hauling oil with never had that problem as the heater would roast you to death at -40 DEG not sure what was done to make it work so well, but it was set up for extreme cold weather driving.
 
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I never hit 300 EGT when pulling my 20Klb toyhauler up steep grades at 100 degree outside temps with my 6.4. usually around 285-290. However I don't have emissions on it either.

I do remember not being able to get the heater and the defrost to work in the 7.3 when I was frequenting trips to Montanta in the dead of winter while racing sled dogs.

Temps outside were probably around 10 to -20. It was a PIA because we could never get the windshield to clear off which became dangerous as hell on some of the backroads pulling a trailer at 3am all while freezing our asses off.

I remember one tme running out of diesel in the back country because we had to keep the truck running all night and day (still no heat).
Fortunately my host had a construction company with a fuel truck to come rescue us during one race.
 

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I never hit 300 EGT when pulling my 20Klb toyhauler up steep grades at 100 degree outside temps with my 6.4. usually around 285-290. However I don't have emissions on it either.

I do remember not being able to get the heater and the defrost to work in the 7.3 when I was frequenting trips to Montanta in the dead of winter while racing sled dogs.

Temps outside were probably around 10 to -20. It was a PIA because we could never get the windshield to clear off which became dangerous as hell on some of the backroads pulling a trailer at 3am all while freezing our asses off.

I remember one tme running out of diesel in the back country because we had to keep the truck running all night and day (still no heat).
Fortunately my host had a construction company with a fuel truck to come rescue us during one race.
Then I would say something is wrong with your egt guage. I think even at idle my cummins was at 300 ish.

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I never hit 300 EGT when pulling my 20Klb toyhauler up steep grades at 100 degree outside temps with my 6.4. usually around 285-290. However I don't have emissions on it either.

I do remember not being able to get the heater and the defrost to work in the 7.3 when I was frequenting trips to Montanta in the dead of winter while racing sled dogs.

Temps outside were probably around 10 to -20. It was a PIA because we could never get the windshield to clear off which became dangerous as hell on some of the backroads pulling a trailer at 3am all while freezing our asses off.

I remember one tme running out of diesel in the back country because we had to keep the truck running all night and day (still no heat).
Fortunately my host had a construction company with a fuel truck to come rescue us during one race.
I think you confused EGT and ECT or made a typo. A diesel cannot have EGT of less than 300 degrees. Now ECT yes. Likley much mower than that. I would suspect 225 ECT or less.
 
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I think you confused EGT and ECT or made a typo. A diesel cannot have EGT of less than 300 degrees. Now ECT yes. Likley much mower than that. I would suspect 225 ECT or less.
Making me now want to check my CTS gauge.

Not sure where the sensor is located unless it's the one just before where the DPF was.

My ECT reaches about 195-205 in hot weather climbs.

I do know that there was no heat in my 7.3 in very cold climates.
 

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EGTs in a few of my trucks..
89 12v Cummins, non-IC, warm @ idle - 280f
05 5.9 Cummins - warm @ idle - 325f
16 6.7 Cummins - warm @ idle - 380f
03 ISX 450 Cummins - warm @ idle - 300f
97 N14 Cummins - warm @ idle - 315f

Couldn't tell you a thing about Ferds.... 😂
 

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@Paddy NS - have you got the x3 out for another ride since the overheat? We need a follow up to put your thread back on track Lol
 
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Paddy I am more affected by the picture of your machine in the garage NOT melting, lol. For us guys in the Mid-south US it can be fun to ride and play in the snow and cold but getting back to a warmish garage is a draw. But if you had a heater you would need a floor drain.
 
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