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Any reason why you went with the vented filter and block off instead of sealed looping back to the crank case? you could of went either way right? just wondering the decision making process im about to do same setup
I didn’t want anything going back in and knowing there would still be some in the vapor I’m glad I did it that way. The stuff that the catch can catches Is pretty nasty.


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Any reason why you went with the vented filter and block off instead of sealed looping back to the crank case? you could of went either way right? just wondering the decision making process im about to do same setup
The air/vapor still has un-condensed material, I'd rather keep it out of the system.
It would help keep you oil cleaner too.
By design, the motor should have the recycled air back into the intake. Venting the valve cover to atmosphere may cause it to run rich. I used a 'water separator' as apposed to a 'catch can'. Is there a difference, IDK? But, I checked the outlet hose from mine and it was dry. No oil, no gas, no moisture! You can see mine in post #3, it has 3 levels of what was caught. Keep it drained and you'll have clean air back to the intake and turbo.
 

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By design, the motor should have the recycled air back into the intake. Venting the valve cover to atmosphere may cause it to run rich. I used a 'water separator' as apposed to a 'catch can'. Is there a difference, IDK? But, I checked the outlet hose from mine and it was dry. No oil, no gas, no moisture! You can see mine in post #3, it has 3 levels of what was caught. Keep it drained and you'll have clean air back to the intake and turbo.
hmm....I need to look into this, I've never heard there would be an issue for rich to run just clean air or a need to run crankcase air into the intake except for emissions. If anything I would think it would run leaner where dirty air would fatten it up.
 

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The air is partly air from the turbo being force past the rings then up through the crank case vent. This is metered air. But it’s very minimal. It’s under pressure and mostly the garbage any catch can will catch will be the somewhat dried oil that’s dirty by the inside of the crank case.

Venting could cause it to run ever slightly leaner as there is a higher air:fuel ratio. It’d probably never be anywhere close to .1 .2 leaner but it does make a difference. If you’re running on the razor’s edge, maybe. But you’d be the guy milking it for every oz and already have planned for this.

Google positive crank case ventilation for some nifty pics.

I have always run ‘closed circuit’ for pcv’s but had buddies that swore by the air filter attached. Problem was those filters and the outwears would get caked in oil vapor and crap. Oem’s recycle the air as there is emissions requirements for them, otherwise they’d probably just slap a vent filter on and call it a day.

I do know that I hated my buddies vents, hit the 1320, come off the gas and the truck smelled like burning oil for the next hour. We don’t have that issue here.


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Who's made their own catch can? I think I found all the parts on Amazon to mimic the Whalen Speed version using a stainless can instead of plastic and still using AN12 fittings. Looking for mounting ideas for the can and what you used to plug the hole in the intake. I thought about the daystar shock res mounts for the can itself. Looks like I'm saving myself about $75 doing it myslef but am looking for ideas before I pull the trigger on the parts. Thanks!
e bay you can buy them for about $75
 
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From my understanding with engine efficiency, you cause a negative impact the combustion chamber from re-circulation.

A breather pipe allows an internal combustion engine to vent crankcase pressure out of the engine. By venting pressure out of the engine's piston rings are allowed to seal tighter against the cylinder walls.
 

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From my understanding with engine efficiency, you cause a negative impact the combustion chamber from re-circulation.

A breather pipe allows an internal combustion engine to vent crankcase pressure out of the engine. By venting pressure out of the engine's piston rings are allowed to seal tighter against the cylinder walls.
I'm having trouble picturing this. If "vented out of the engine", it works on crankcase pressure only. If vented and drawn back by "vacuum", filtered, into the intake, the crankcase pressure would be lower. Allowing better ring sealing. I see the vacuum pulling out of the crankcase as a good thing. Increasing the RPM's will increase the vacuum.
 

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From my understanding with engine efficiency, you cause a negative impact the combustion chamber from re-circulation.

A breather pipe allows an internal combustion engine to vent crankcase pressure out of the engine. By venting pressure out of the engine's piston rings are allowed to seal tighter against the cylinder walls.
From my understanding with engine efficiency, you cause a negative impact the combustion chamber from re-circulation.

A breather pipe allows an internal combustion engine to vent crankcase pressure out of the engine. By venting pressure out of the engine's piston rings are allowed to seal tighter against the cylinder walls.
I would worry about the catch can you have attached. They spell 'out' backwards, 'tuo'. I wonder how they spell 'in'?
 

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I'm having trouble picturing this. If "vented out of the engine", it works on crankcase pressure only. If vented and drawn back by "vacuum", filtered, into the intake, the crankcase pressure would be lower. Allowing better ring sealing. I see the vacuum pulling out of the crankcase as a good thing. Increasing the RPM's will increase the vacuum.
Check around with high performance engine builders. The only reason you recirculate is for emissions.

Optimized crankcase ventilation systems and the addition of a vacuum pump can swing positive crankcase pressures to zero (atmospheric) or even negative values (vacuum). These solutions may be achievable, there is no substitute for a well-designed, high-quality dry-sump system and all of the benefits that can be delivered. For the rest of us, the benefits of the lower-cost alternatives are well worth the cost. Once a solution is employed to reduce crankcase pressure, the result is “free horsepower.” This is “free” in the sense that no additional fuel needs to be burned to realize the power. Instead, the reduced crankcase pressure is simply freeing up or realizing new horsepower from increased engine efficiency and reduced power losses.

An aftermarket solution, like Catch Can eliminates positive crankcase pressure by venting the crankcase pressure to the atmosphere by way of the vented catch can. Lower crankcase pressures (0-to-1 psi) result in better ring seal and increased performance usually on the order of a 2-to-3 percent increase in power. The system also eliminated the issue of introducing oil from the crankcase into the compressor inlets, charge piping and intercooler.
 

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The way I make my own catch cans are very simple. I do not use a breather on top. You want to catch the oil mist yet still have the benefits of a vacuum on your crankcase. Having a vacuum on your crankcase is a good thing for horsepower and an great way to vent the pressure out. So, make a can, run a tube that dumps the oil mist into the can towards the bottom. Then the outlet, make a screened or scotchbrite filter to catch any residual oil before going back into the intake track. If you use a vented system you are not gaining the benefits of any vacuum being pulled from the intake. Also, venting to below the engine is not a good idea either. The chances of dirt, dust and other unwanted items can and will migrate back into your engine. In drag racing, we would use a check valve and use the exhaust to pull a vacuum and run it out the rear. Best case if you are going for all out power is to use a vacuum pump. Although, going to that extreme you have to be careful about creating too much vacuum and pulling oil off of the rings, and piston pins.
Just my long way of giving my .02¢
 

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The way I make my own catch cans are very simple. I do not use a breather on top. You want to catch the oil mist yet still have the benefits of a vacuum on your crankcase. Having a vacuum on your crankcase is a good thing for horsepower and an great way to vent the pressure out. So, make a can, run a tube that dumps the oil mist into the can towards the bottom. Then the outlet, make a screened or scotchbrite filter to catch any residual oil before going back into the intake track. If you use a vented system you are not gaining the benefits of any vacuum being pulled from the intake. Also, venting to below the engine is not a good idea either. The chances of dirt, dust and other unwanted items can and will migrate back into your engine. In drag racing, we would use a check valve and use the exhaust to pull a vacuum and run it out the rear. Best case if you are going for all out power is to use a vacuum pump. Although, going to that extreme you have to be careful about creating too much vacuum and pulling oil off of the rings, and piston pins.
Just my long way of giving my .02¢
Your thinking along the same lines as me. Yeah, it's for emissions originally, but keeping a vacuum on the vent by way of the intake is the way it is designed, to clear the crankcase. Adding a water separator/catch can insures filtered air back to the intake without upsetting the air/fuel ratio. The upset may only be .1% or .2% but without a dyno tune you don't know if it helps or hurts the ratio. And, yes, I know there is some gas vapor filtered along with oil and water. The oil doesn't compress well, but the fuel vapor and water injection back into the motor may be a good thing, but the amount of water caught I catch is to much to go back in.

We all agree it's a good idea to stop the junk from returning to the turbo, but we may agree to disagree on where it drains to.
Yes, a drag racer will not recycle it, or a dragster will have a vapor line connected to a header, but they are designed that way, and I'm sure, have been on a dyno.
 
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