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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They are extremely soft so I thought I would check the pressure. You can’t check the pressure without losing a little bit so I’d like to know what they are set at. Before you tell me change the springs I’ve already done that. I plan on buying a needle kit to fill them up.


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They are extremely soft so I thought I would check the pressure. You can’t check the pressure without losing a little bit so I’d like to know what they are set at. Before you tell me change the springs I’ve already done that. I plan on buying a needle kit to fill them up.


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I know Power Tank sells them if you need a source. That's where I bought mine from.
 
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Thanks! Any idea on psi for the xrs?


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No, they are really still too new on the market. Most brand name shocks like King, Elka, Fox RC2s are in the 200 - 225 psi range. But even new from the factory, they are all over the map. Once I checked a friend who had Elka 5s on his Wildcat. 4 different readings, lowest was 78, highest was 145. So yeah, shocks don't always come through perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No, they are really still too new on the market. Most brand name shocks like King, Elka, Fox RC2s are in the 200 - 225 psi range. But even new from the factory, they are all over the map. Once I checked a friend who had Elka 5s on his Wildcat. 4 different readings, lowest was 78, highest was 145. So yeah, shocks don't always come through perfect.
Thx Hollywood!


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On the razor XPT with the fox internal bypass shocks, the Manual calls for75 PSI. The internal bypass shocks can run much lower psi because there’s no risk of cavitation due to the bypasses. By running the lower psi you’ll get a better ride over the chatter. Most other shocks call for between 150 and 225.
 

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Here’s a copy and paste from an article. I believe it’s from Tom Morris

As with a regular external bypass shocks, there is no cavitation in the compression stroke due to the inner cylinder being capped off from shock oil flow to reservoir area. Base valves can be fitted to this inner cylinder design so that if any cavitation is occurring during the rebound cycle it can be eliminated. This also allows for very low reservoir nitrogen gas pressures to be used that will reduce seal wear as well as let the shock shaft move very easily at low shaft speeds, giving a little more comfortable ride over the small rocks.
 

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I plan to switch mine to a Schrader.

I like to check pressure before every big dune trip and the Schrader makes it easier.

I would love to know the correct psi also. AReed?

Tim
 
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About 100-125psi is what I would do.
If you were a hardcore desert guy where fading out the shocks was an issue you could bump it up to 150-200.
It all depends really, we run between 50-250 depending on the application.

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They are extremely soft so I thought I would check the pressure. You can’t check the pressure without losing a little bit so I’d like to know what they are set at. Before you tell me change the springs I’ve already done that. I plan on buying a needle kit to fill them up.


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I was under the impression that the Nitrogen in the shock resi was there for reasons other than to add load resistance pressure...I've always heard it's there for cooling and fluid stabilization...any other thoughts??
 
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