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Have any of you guys used one of the Burk HID kits off of Ebay? If so can you put the HID's on the High and Low beams? I was looking and his instructions said to just put them on the low beams. why is that?
 

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The reason is probably for those that drive on the street. You can switch to your stock headlight so you don't blind uncoming traffic. I run Eagle HID's hi & low beams - haven't heard of Burk but I'm no hid guru either. I prefer 6k color in my hids from what I have run.
 

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My rear shocks are now at 0 high and low speed compression. Still a little too stiff. The rebound is going to wind up somewhere around 10 to 15 clicks.
Typically you want to keep your low-speed compression and rebound within about 3-4 clicks of each other. The way you have the 'clickers' set, the wheel will compress quickly on impact but expand (rebound) slowly. The end result is the wheel will not follow the ground smoothly - this is where the harsh ride comes from.

I would reset the clickers to factory settings and then turn the low-speed compression and rebound out 2 additional clicks. I would leave the high speed compression near the factory setting.

As you fine-tune the clickers try to keep the low-speed compression and rebound settings close to each other.

One more thing, you turn the adjuster (clicker) all the way in (be gentle on that last click) and then count clicks turning counterclockwise. Usually (I don't have a Maverick...yet) counterclockwise is softer.

So if the manual says '15 clicks' that is almost always 15 clicks out from all the way in.

Hope this helps.

-Jeff
 

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Typically you want to keep your low-speed compression and rebound within about 3-4 clicks of each other. The way you have the 'clickers' set, the wheel will compress quickly on impact but expand (rebound) slowly. The end result is the wheel will not follow the ground smoothly - this is where the harsh ride comes from.


As you fine-tune the clickers try to keep the low-speed compression and rebound settings close to each other.
Can you explain this cause I'm not understanding the reasoning.
I don't understand how there is a relation between slow speed clicks and rebounds clicks.
 

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Have any of you guys used one of the Burk HID kits off of Ebay? If so can you put the HID's on the High and Low beams? I was looking and his instructions said to just put them on the low beams. why is that?
I have Burke's (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Can-Am-Comm...ors_ATV_Parts_Accessories&hash=item19c9d307c9) HIDs on all my quads. On my KFX 700 I have the Terex light kit with halogen on low beam and HID on high beam. On both my KFX 450, and my LTZ 400 I have HID on the low beam and nothing on High beam. Some of his kits do have a high and low beam and some don't. Depends on what bulb type, size, and base are available to fit a particular application. The reason for putting them on low beam vs high beam....? It's just the way the plugs were pre-wired. I haven't orderd a set for the Mavrick yet, but I'm assuming you install them on the low beam and leave the high beam intact?
 

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Can you explain this cause I'm not understanding the reasoning.
I don't understand how there is a relation between slow speed clicks and rebounds clicks.
To reiterate, we're talking about low-speed compression adjusters and rebound adjusters. These adjusters (clickers) allow a certain amount of fluid to bypass the shim stack. The shim stack in the shock is what provides the damping (there is one or more for the low-speed compression and for the rebound).
As you turn the adjuster out (typically) you allow more fluid to bypass the shim stack, thereby softening the damping action.

Put simply the low-speed compression adjuster controls how quickly the shock will compress; the rebound adjuster controls how quickly the shock will expand. It's more complicated than that but its not a bad way to think about it.

When you want to 'soften' the damping action of the shock, you should move the low-speed compression and rebound adjusters together. This keeps the shock action working at basically the same speed and it compresses and expands. To adjust for differing terrain you can adjust 1-3 clicks on the low-speed compression or rebound independently.

For example:
Lots of square edge bumps, you might back the compression out two clicks to soften the initial impact
Sand, you might add two clicks of rebound.

The shocks on the X rs have a lot of potential. You should be able to find a sweet spot and only have to make minor changes from there.

If I didn't answer your question, let me know.

-Jeff
 

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Make sure the blub socket fits, the 9005 are different size then the 9006 on the HID's. If the Maverick light socket are the same as the Commanders, then run both the same size 9005. The high beam light socket on the high beam side are angled higher to beam the light further out thats all. I bought the 9006 thinking they would work, but they didn't fit in the light socket. Even thou the stock light are 9005 and 9006, just the HID I bought the 9006 wouldn't fit. Get the 6K
 

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To reiterate, we're talking about low-speed compression adjusters and rebound adjusters. These adjusters (clickers) allow a certain amount of fluid to bypass the shim stack. The shim stack in the shock is what provides the damping (there is one more for the low-speed compression and for the rebound).
As you turn the adjuster out (typically) you allow more fluid to bypass the shim stack, thereby softening the damping action.

Put simply the low-speed compression adjuster controls how quickly the shock will compress; the rebound adjuster controls how quickly the shock will expand. It's more complicated than that but its not a bad way to think about it.

When you want to 'soften' the damping action of the shock, you should move the low-speed compression and rebound adjusters together. This keeps the shock action working at basically the same speed and it compresses and expands. To adjust for differing terrain you can adjust 1-3 clicks on the low-speed compression or rebound independently.

For example:
Lots of square edge bumps, you might back the compression out two clicks to soften the initial impact
Sand, you might add two clicks of rebound.

The shocks on the X rs have a lot of potential. You should be able to find a sweet spot and only have to make minor changes from there.

-Jeff
Jeff, I've never heard any one tune a shock like that, not saying its wrong but I don't really think its the best way to go about it. I'm not trying to argue one bit but simply explain my reasoning behind that.

The rebound is the only adjustment that bypasses fluid around the piston. The compression adjustment is used by slowing down the flow of the fluid from the body of the shock to the reservoir due to the shock's shaft displacing fluid with something similar to a metering valve. For heat sake the more you close off the rebound the less heat it will create and the more you open up the compression the less it will heat up.

The compression and rebound are completely independent of each other. The rebound is there to control the expansion of the spring. I've never had to adjust the rebound on a race vehicle while I was changing compression valving or adjustment, only when a spring rate is changed or a dual rate gets adjusted which doesn't apply here. Once rebound is dialed in it rarely needs to get changed in a high performance application, at least that's what I've found out here on the east coast. Generally you want the rebound as fast as possible (that you can control) but not slow enough to allow it to pack up. Your rear rebound adjustment is mainly the one that makes you lawn dart into the ground and that's due to the valving not being able to control the expansion of the spring. The can also be caused in conjunction with compression valving but that's like opening a can or worms. The more you slow the rebound down to control the bucking the less forgiveness you have in the compression because since you are not letting the shock push out as fast as it wants your compression now has to counter your adjustment. This I think is what you were trying to explain. Now the compression does get changed as driving conditions may very from track to track or different types of terrain. I do agree that the XRS shocks have a lot of potential but not with the factory valving in the shocks or progressive springs. In a performance application the shocks should be tuned mostly by the valving and fine tuned with the adjusters. While the Maverick valving is decent from the factory there's no way the external adjusters are going to "fix it" or get it to its potential.

The reality is the external compression adjustments don't offer as broad of an adjustment as everyone thinks they do but low speed compression adjustments do offer more than double adjustment in pounds as the high speed adjustment. I have dyno sheets that show what I'm talking about.

For the average Joe I would have the rebound adjustments set in the middle and when the vehicle starts to get bouncy you need to slow the rebound down or when you feel like you cant keep the tires on the ground, which would be packing up and you would speed it up. The high and low speed adjustments should be all the way out and then tighten them up as needed to control bottoming. You want to use all the travel that the shock has to offer so keep an eye on the shock shaft to see if the wiper has taken the dust off or if the dust is building up due to it never getting wiped of the shock shaft, zip ties make this extremely simple. Also I don't think the average Joe is going to complain about it much but I think its due to the fact that they don't know how good their suspension can be. If average Joe took one ride in a tuned vehicle compared to a stock one with tweaked external adjustments it you blow their mind.
This is all opinion from tuning race vehicles over the last couple years, this has worked best for me. Some techniques were better for other people.

Alex
 

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Jeff, I've never heard any one tune a shock like that, not saying its wrong but I don't really think its the best way to go about it. I'm not trying to argue one bit but simply explain my reasoning behind that.

The rebound is the only adjustment that bypasses fluid around the piston. The compression adjustment is used by slowing down the flow of the fluid from the body of the shock to the reservoir due to the shock's shaft displacing fluid with something similar to a metering valve. For heat sake the more you close off the rebound the less heat it will create and the more you open up the compression the less it will heat up.

The compression and rebound are completely independent of each other. The rebound is there to control the expansion of the spring. I've never had to adjust the rebound on a race vehicle while I was changing compression valving or adjustment, only when a spring rate is changed or a dual rate gets adjusted which doesn't apply here. Once rebound is dialed in it rarely needs to get changed in a high performance application, at least that's what I've found out here on the east coast. Generally you want the rebound as fast as possible (that you can control) but not slow enough to allow it to pack up. Your rear rebound adjustment is mainly the one that makes you lawn dart into the ground and that's due to the valving not being able to control the expansion of the spring. The can also be caused in conjunction with compression valving but that's like opening a can or worms. The more you slow the rebound down to control the bucking the less forgiveness you have in the compression because since you are not letting the shock push out as fast as it wants your compression now has to counter your adjustment. This I think is what you were trying to explain. Now the compression does get changed as driving conditions may very from track to track or different types of terrain. I do agree that the XRS shocks have a lot of potential but not with the factory valving in the shocks or progressive springs. In a performance application the shocks should be tuned mostly by the valving and fine tuned with the adjusters. While the Maverick valving is decent from the factory there's no way the external adjusters are going to "fix it" or get it to its potential.

The reality is the external compression adjustments don't offer as broad of an adjustment as everyone thinks they do but low speed compression adjustments do offer more than double adjustment in pounds as the high speed adjustment. I have dyno sheets that show what I'm talking about.

For the average Joe I would have the rebound adjustments set in the middle and when the vehicle starts to get bouncy you need to slow the rebound down or when you feel like you cant keep the tires on the ground, which would be packing up and you would speed it up. The high and low speed adjustments should be all the way out and then tighten them up as needed to control bottoming. You want to use all the travel that the shock has to offer so keep an eye on the shock shaft to see if the wiper has taken the dust off or if the dust is building up due to it never getting wiped of the shock shaft, zip ties make this extremely simple. Also I don't think the average Joe is going to complain about it much but I think its due to the fact that they don't know how good their suspension can be. If average Joe took one ride in a tuned vehicle compared to a stock one with tweaked external adjustments it you blow their mind.
This is all opinion from tuning race vehicles over the last couple years, this has worked best for me. Some techniques were better for other people.

Alex
Alex, thanks for the reply. In the interest of full disclosure, I don't have a Maverick yet and I come from a Motocross background. As an amateur I still spend a fair amount of time working with the suspension.

I realize that the rising rate (or PDS) configuration of a motocross bike is different from a SLA or wishbone setup but the way the shock works should be similar. Also, I may have gotten the bypass function of the compression circuit mixed up with MX forks. I have some research to do there :)

With regards to tuning, this is how I typically approach it. First, re-valve the suspension (and if necessary, re-spring). I have never ridden anything with stock suspenders that was valved well enough to make me comfortable enough to go fast. I run Ohlins on my KTM.

I usually start with the tuners settings (which are typically middle of the road) and tweak from there. Document the initial settings and document the changes. I typically carry a small notebook around with the track or area name, suspension settings and comments. The adjustments I listed as an example are taken from experience on the bike. I'm a little surprised that you wouldn't make small changes to the rebound and compression based on the type of terrain. Maybe the SxS's are not as sensitive (also not sure what kind of vehicle you are racing)?

I agree with everything else you said. The zip tie trick is great, you want to be using all of the suspension off the biggest obstacle. I think most guys are either going to fiddle with the the adjusters and seriously degrade the ride or find something acceptable and just leave it.

It would be great to get some spring values, pre-load measurements and clicker settings up in a sticky. I think it would help make this site a go-to resource and result in more happy owners.

Finally, if you have a known resource for revalving the Fox shocks and some spring recommendations I'd like to hear.

Apologies for the novel and partial thread-jack.

Thanks,
-Jeff
 

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Ill have a front and rear put on a dyno soon so I can get some numbers and ill also check the spring rate the best I can. At that time ill open one up and see what's going on inside.

I know the Fox's pretty well as Im a Fox dealer, deal directly with them on a regular basis and I revalve and tune about a dozen of them a week for various applications. If you have a question shoot.

I'm curious to what piston they use in this shock along with the valve configuration.

Alex
 

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Discussion Starter · #132 ·
Very good info going on here! I've revalved shocks on three vehicles of mine in the past. King coilover's, bypass, and Fox air shox. So I have regular shocks down pretty good. Regular as in changing out valve stacks. These fully adjustable shocks are new to me. But I do understand that the rebound is adjusted by turning the screw, which turns a shaft that is inside of the hollow main shaft, that then opens up the rebound stack. And I understand about how the comp is adjusted, but I have no idea what the comp adjuster looks like, or how it differentiates between the high and the low speed. Any pics of the comp adjusters would be appreciated.
I am very interested to know what the spring rates are. I kind of think that the rear spring rate is too stiff. I think that is a lot of the reason of why it rides too rough for me. Also, with a softer spring rate, I would no longer have to have the compression adjustments set to zero for the desert. It looks like it's either change the rear spring rate, or go to a softer compression valve stack.
I have been documenting my shock settings, so I need to share that pretty soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #133 ·
I did a little google'ing, and I figured out how the high/low speed adjuster works. The low-speed adjuster just opens or closes an orphis to allow more or less oil to pass through. The high-speed adjuster adjusts the spring tension on a type of blowoff valve. I've been mostly adjusting the high-speed one for the sand dunes, but I should probably be adjusting the low speed compression instead. Or both!
 

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The high speed/low speed compression is kinda like a popit (spelling?) valve in a bypass shock. The only thing I can imagine is each adjuster has a spring for, low speed would be soft and high speed would be firm. I honestly haven't had a reason to take one apart but I can tell you on a shock dyno there is very little difference between the two adjusters as far as speed sensitive dampening goes.

I did this shock write up on Teryx forums several months back and if you guys would like I can tear one of these down and hopefully shed some light in the shock and suspension area.
Shock tech - Kawasaki Teryx Forum
 

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I created a new thread that contains the tuning information from the RideFox.com web site and formatted it for easier reading on this site. It has a troubleshooting section for diagnosing handling issues as well. Also there is a link to the Fox owners manual for the Podium X shocks on the X rs.

Link to the thread

From the manual, here is a cutaway of the Podium X shock:

Text Line Diagram Technical drawing Drawing
 
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