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Yes, just do 63 and you know you're good. I tend to go on the higher end, especially on suspension nuts. If you are torquing the head of a bolt instead of the nut for clearance reasons, add 10% to the value you're using.

2018.5 X3 Max XRS // Grove Fabworks, Aftermarket Assassins, Dynojet, CT front end, CA Tech, UMP, HSP, Rugged, Sandcraft, blah blah...
 

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Thanks, also does it matter if the sway bar is a little of center?
 

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They have a tendency to move back and forth any ways so your good, I think they give you a range because torque wrenches ( depending on brand) are not spot on they usually have a +/- 2 on the better makes
 

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They have a tendency to move back and forth any ways so your good, I think they give you a range because torque wrenches ( depending on brand) are not spot on they usually have a +/- 2 on the better makes
^^^ That. I have several torque wrenches, all are + / - 3 to 5 lbs /fps
As stated, I start with the lowest number, recheck 100 miles / 1 week later.

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I always tend to go a couple more on the higher side especially on suspension bolts and then I mark every bolt with some paint so I know if they move at all.
Best way I know of too. Better to know, than guess.
 

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I will throw this in just as an extra piece of wisdom. A dial indicator torque wrench is better than a click torque wrench if you are truly anal in what you are tightening. Using a dial torque wrench as you are tightening the bolt you can watch the dial and as it tightens the reading should climb at a fairly even rate. If you are tightening the bolt and the reading slows or stops for a short period of time the bolt is bad and needs to be replaced because it has stretched beyond the limits set for that bolt. A click type torque wrench you will not notice how the bolt reacts to torque and could loosen after use causing problems.
 

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I will throw this in just as an extra piece of wisdom. A dial indicator torque wrench is better than a click torque wrench if you are truly anal in what you are tightening. Using a dial torque wrench as you are tightening the bolt you can watch the dial and as it tightens the reading should climb at a fairly even rate. If you are tightening the bolt and the reading slows or stops for a short period of time the bolt is bad and needs to be replaced because it has stretched beyond the limits set for that bolt. A click type torque wrench you will not notice how the bolt reacts to torque and could loosen after use causing problems.
Good information, old dog learned new trick.
Dog afraid to know how much more I'd have to spend of a dial type torque wrench.


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Not pricey at all when your son is a snap on engineer. I think I have a dozen or so in various size and ranges from 1/4",3/8",1/2", 3/4 and 1' drives and 12 in-lb thru 600 ft-lb.[h=2][/h] thur 600 ft lbs.
 

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During my time in the service I was also told by the calibration guys that a percentage of the bottom range was not considered accurate either. That was in the late 80's, so I'm not sure it that holds true today.
 

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During my time in the service I was also told by the calibration guys that a percentage of the bottom range was not considered accurate either. That was in the late 80's, so I'm not sure it that holds true today.
It does. Never use the bottom 20% of the range.
To clarify, subtract 20% of the max torque rating from the bottom end of use.

Example: if you have a 0-100 ft lbs torque wrench...20% of 100 = 20. Therefore, you should only use 20-100 ft lbs range.

In addition, the +/- rating of the torque wrench should also be subtracted from the top and lower torque ratings.

Example: continuing with the 0-100 ft lbs wrench above, assume the torque wrench is calibrated to +/- 8%. 8% of 20 = 1.6; 8% of 100 = 8 Therefore, the usable range of a 0-100 ft lbs torque wrench calibrated to 8% is 21.6 to 92 ft lbs.
 

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In addition, the +/- rating of the torque wrench should also be subtracted from the top and lower torque ratings.

Example: continuing with the 0-100 ft lbs wrench above, assume the torque wrench is calibrated to +/- 8%. 8% of 20 = 1.6; 8% of 100 = 8 Therefore, the usable range of a 0-100 ft lbs torque wrench calibrated to 8% is 21.6 to 92 ft lbs.
I'm not trying to spell check you, just adding to the discussion.

In your example ±8% is in regards to accuracy and would be stated as full scale or indicated value. Your example discusses accuracy full scale so I'll add to that. If you torque a fastener to 92 ft. lbs with a 100 ft. lb wrench calibrated @ ±8% accuracy FS you are applying between 84.64 and 99.36 ft. lbs minus running torque (assuming you are using a click wrench in lieu of a deflecting beam wrench)
Additionally, the usable range mentioned of 20% to 100% generally applies to quality mechanical wrenches; quality electronic wrenches generally have a useable range of 10% to 100%.
±4% accuracy FS is typical of high quality torque wrenches.

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Unless the nut is self locking then you need to do a run on torque test with a dial torque driver. If the friction of the locking feature is say 3-5 lbs. then you need to add 3-5 lbs extra to your final torque. That is an aerospace standard and does apply to all locking fasteners. Even if you torque it to the high side you still could be under torqued due to the frictional values of the locking nut.
 
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