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I hear lots of good about the turn key tie rods or something similar there are a few choices. Up grade to those. There's a thread about on here somewhere.
 

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I found these impellers on Ebay.
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/221216933995?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1586.l2649#ht_677wt_952
I Installed one on my XRS and it actually made a difference. They flow alot better than the stock plastic Impeller.

It took me longer to take off the plastics to get to it than to change the thing.

Now if I could just stop bending tie-rods :sad:
I don't mean to sound ignorant, but how can you tell it's flowing any different? Is it cooling faster?

I've been looking into trying one, just waiting on some more reviews.
 

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I ran a high flow impeller on my 880 Teryx and it helped.
 

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Not sure why anyone would equate a "High Flow impeller" with better cooling. A high flow fan and even a larger radiator I get that argument. Increasing the coolant flow will not decrease the time is takes to exchange the heat in the coolant. The amount of time it takes to lower the coolant temp is not a function of flow it is really all about the efficiency of the radiator. Don't get me wrong it is a cool part and will probably last forever (or wear something out more expensive to replace) and if I needed to replace a stock one I would go this way.
 

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I believe on the commander forum,the designer/owner came on to speak about how he and his buddies had been running them for awhile on there Rens with good success, in the amount of time there fans were staying on compared to before the mod.
 

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Not sure why anyone would equate a "High Flow impeller" with better cooling. A high flow fan and even a larger radiator I get that argument. Increasing the coolant flow will not decrease the time is takes to exchange the heat in the coolant. The amount of time it takes to lower the coolant temp is not a function of flow it is really all about the efficiency of the radiator. Don't get me wrong it is a cool part and will probably last forever (or wear something out more expensive to replace) and if I needed to replace a stock one I would go this way.
X2. If my memory isn't shot I believe that heat dissipation is a function of time/length. So, by increasing the rate of flow of the coolant wouldn't you effectively be reducing the radiators ability it cool?

Nate
Alba Racing
 

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Not if the radiator is efficient enough to support the flow. Another thing to consider is for trail riders or rock crawlers that go slower or dont have the motor spinning fast, their pumps arent moving as much coolant.
 

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Not sure why anyone would equate a "High Flow impeller" with better cooling. A high flow fan and even a larger radiator I get that argument. Increasing the coolant flow will not decrease the time is takes to exchange the heat in the coolant. The amount of time it takes to lower the coolant temp is not a function of flow it is really all about the efficiency of the radiator. Don't get me wrong it is a cool part and will probably last forever (or wear something out more expensive to replace) and if I needed to replace a stock one I would go this way.
I'm not sure why anyone would think flow doesn't have a direct impact to heat load on a cooling system. Heat load is directly related to flow and temperature drop through the radiator. This expression should explain it Q = M * cp *dT. In simple terms, if you raise the flowrate the dT across the radiator will decrease. This results in a higher outlet, but lower inlet to maintain the average core temp.

This doesn't mean raising the flowrate is always an option. You have limitations. But, in this case it could be very beneficial to those who spend most of their riding on slow technical trails.
 
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