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Discussion Starter #1
Hey there forum.

Putting on my gear from Team FAS (Thanks JT) and I am getting a "pop" through my amp when I turn off anything with a relay.

Wired up a fuse block in the back straight to the battery, relays on the LEDs.

The Amp is wired to the same fuse block. Tried different grounding spots, still pops when I turn off the LEDs.

I found a few car audio resources that are recommending a capacitor over the power lead on the relay to help absorb the pop, has anyone else run into this??

Thanks,

Jonathan
 

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You have a ground loop. Simple Fix
 

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You have a ground loop. Simple Fix
Thanks for the quick feedback. I am not sure I follow.

Everyone is using the same ground. I just ran the switch, LED, amp, and radio off the same ground and power and I still have the pop. It happens on both loaded and unloaded relays.

The new fuse block is providing hot (always on power) while everything in the dash is switched via key with radio and switch panel on separate circuits.

For troubleshooting, I ran the power and ground from the fuse block to the switch and the radio and it is still popping on power off.

Heading out riding in the morning and hope to isolate the issue. I'll keep investigating, any pointers anyone has would be appreciated.

Thanks again.
 

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When two or more devices are connected to a common ground through different paths, ground path noise, or a ground loop can occur. Thus, a system grounded at two different points, with a potential difference between the two grounds can cause unwanted noise voltage in the circuit paths. Currents flow through these multiple paths and develop voltages which can cause damage, noise or 50Hz/60Hz hum in audio or video equipment. The ground loop can be eliminated in one of two ways:

Remove one of the ground paths, thus converting the system to a single point ground.Isolate one of the ground paths with an isolation transformer, common mode choke, optical coupler, balanced circuitry, or frequency selective grounding.

The most practical and usually most cost effective method for consumer audio applications is to use an isolation transformer. An isolation transformer is a device which, in the case of cable signals, allows all the desired signals to pass freely, while interrupting ground continuity, hence breaking ground loops. By using an isolation transformer, the ground noise voltage will now appear between the transformer windings and not circuit input. The noise coupling is primarily a function of parasitic capacitance between the transformer windings and can be reduced by placing a shield between the windings. This is an effective method to implement assuming the transformer has sufficient bandwidth, isn't too costly or bulky, and a direct DC signal path is not required for the application
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It was not a ground loop issue. The issue was basically a backflow of EMF coming off an energized relay getting back on the switch wire.

The fix was to use a relay with a suppression diode. Swapped out relays and the problem went away.

The relay I used was a Cole Hersee RC-400012-DS-BX.

Thanks for the input.
 
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