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Discussion Starter #1
Hey I took my maverick out today since snow is gone and it's mostly dry on the dirt roads and my maverick is pulling hard to the right. I replaced tie rods last fall and put 30 inch motoclaws on it. Service manual says front toe is to be set at 0mm which is fine I can do that but what I needed to know is how do you know when tires are straight at 0mm and not turned either left or right? Any tricks you guys know of would be appreciated. Thanks


Chris
 

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measure tie rod lenght, should be the same lenght each side.
 

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Also check tire pressure. a low tire will pull to the side.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Tire pressure is good to go. Will do the tie rods tomorrow. Most likley i screwed it up when i put the tie rods on
 

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Tire pressure is good to go. Will do the tie rods tomorrow. Most likley i screwed it up when i put the tie rods on
A proper alignment is so much more than the tie rods being set at the same length. I set my steering wheel straight and then do a laser off the back tire to the front. Adjusting 4+times to get it exact.
 

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I own a tire and auto repair shop. I'm going to run mine onto our Hunter Laser rack and do a 4-whl alignment on it; rear toe included.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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Thanks benzo that's an excellent idea I'll do that.
NP ! , for quicker alignment u can measure from center of tire to other center of tire, front side and then do back side of tires and make sure u have the same measurement then 1/8 toe in
 

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Check tire pressure first of course but this is how am checking my maverick

I used a 3 ft level to get my steering wheel straight up and down and then used tie down straps to keep it straight so i could work on it. I then measured from the inside of my wheels to the A-arm mounts on the frame using the grease zerks as a guide to make sure I hit the same spot every measurement. I was able to go off those measurements and get it squared up pretty easily. Now I also have the measurements in case I knock anything out again. For my toe I'll shoot a laser from inside the wheels to the same spot on the other side. Bosch makes a really accurate laser measure for about a $100 which I also use for work.

I also took the time to measure the frame in an X to make sure nothing was off there and I'll keep those measurements as well. It's a little bit harder to measure these things compared to a quad, handle bars used to make it pretty easy to get the front end centered, and we could also string our quads from front to back to find bends or things out of whack. You can't do it with these because the rear tires stick out wider.

If it still pulls after that take the 3 foot level and measure a distance, example 13" high on the tire; making sure the level is parallel to the ground mark the front and back of the tire with chaulk or something you can see. Make the same measurement on the opposing tire. You need to be somewhere level and flat but roll the maverick back so the tire rotates 180 degrees and check the measurements against each other if one is way out of whack compared to the other you could have a stretched tire or one that's just slightly larger from the factory. This will make it pull as well especially if it is in the rear.

Its not as complex as it sounds but it works great. We used to measure our race quads like this all the time to get them straightened out.
 
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