Can-Am Maverick Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Gonna change my clutch out with an after market, qsc primary stm secondary seems to be the consensus best setup from what I have read on here. But I keep seeing mentions of losing engine braking when running this setup, with no real elaboration on the subject. Anyone know if you lose engine braking or is it kind of dependent on the setup?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,631 Posts
You don't completely lose it it just makes it like the Rzrs engine breaking just have to keep hitting the throttle to keep it engaged at lower speeds


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
that sucks, I really like having the engine braking because I live and ride a lot of big mountainous areas. anyone else done anything to fix the crappy clutching without it affecting the engine braking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,127 Posts
I have a CVTech and the stock secondary, and I have engine braking down to 2 mph! So I think as long as you keep the stock secondary, you'll have full engine braking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,631 Posts
Yes they say it helps with the back shifting to always keep it in the max hp range but I ride in the wv mountain and it's not worth not having the stock engine breaking


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Everyone here is on point. The engine braking will be exactly the same until your rpms drop "below engagement" which is essentially 1800 rpms. When you are decelerating that's usually around 5-6 mph. At that point the belt makes a transposition from the sheaves to the one way/two way bearing and That point if equipped with a one way bearing, that handled the engine braking. On aftermarket primaries the bearing is a smaller diameter to give you more bottom end and a lower starting gear ratio. This also comes with a trade off. Stock clutching has a 55 mm one way bearing while after market clutching all offers smaller (50 mm cv tech, 45 mm STM, 44 mm QSC). With a smaller one way bearing you have a smaller surface area for the belt to "grab" onto.

Now on to the secondary. We battled this for months and months. I did so much testing and R&D trying to make it perfect it was unreal. A few changes were made to the design of the STM secondary to make the engine braking below engagement better. We cut helixes down to keep the secondary from trying to open on down hill descents, we had a notch cut into the gen 2 helixes. Several members on here were a part of this process as well and were happy with the results. Several out in the WV mountains.

Like stated before. The engine braking on any aftermarket clutch setup will act the same down to engagement rpm. In my personal, non biased opinion, the performance trade off of an aftermarket secondary is well worth it. Better back shifting, faster up shifting, and extremely tunable. The stock secondary is not capable of back shifting under a load. The STM will. It get you to and keeps you in your peak hp range faster and longer. The stock secondary is extremely inefficient and it puts you at a huge advantage up against someone that does have an STM secondary. In all scenarios.

Sorry for the long winded response. All in all the upgrade to the secondary is well worth it. Truthfully an unbiased, personal opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
I agree with Chris...like he stated it will hold down to the engagement RPM.... Which in high range is around 5 miles per hour but put into lower range and it basically holds all the way down to about 2 miles or 1 mile per hour.... Now if you're looking for it to behave exactly like the stock secondary in regards E break then you better not switch but also don't complain about a clutch that will not back shift.... In other words if you want instant engine braking when dropping over a big cliff then you better be on the throttle slightly so the belt is engaged
If you want the engine braking that is very close to stock they do have it set up much better than it was before and it works awesome for my application which is sometimes damn near vertical all I do is make sure the belt stays engaged with the skinny pedal and in lower range and I have never been out of control going down hills with no brakes
To add to what Chris was saying about the one way bearing is true but with a NEW belt only.... The only problem is if you would call it a problem is that the smaller one way bearing that gives you better performance out of the hole does not grab the belt like the stock bearing... Therefore after a few runs when it tries to grab the belt it slips wearing the ribs down on the inside of the belt that's when you basically lose that function and just make sure the Machine rpm stays above engagement and like I said before you will have zero troubles mine basically on any hill as long as in low range I go down with no brakes. Hope this clarifys.... There are a few threads on this subject and one in particular where me and Chris battled back and forth but finally came to the realization that are terrain and theories on ebrake where different thats when they developed the new helix to work correct for us Mtn goat type people

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,631 Posts
Cool sounds like you guys got the engine breaking figured out Now. I can deal with eb down to 2 to 3 mph. Just the last machine I drove with cvtech and STM sec gen 2 was just like a xp900 eb. I guess I'll start looking at getting one Kris what STM sec setup would I need for 110 rwhp commander with a cvtech


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk - now Free
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,381 Posts
I agree with Chris...like he stated it will hold down to the engagement RPM.... Which in high range is around 5 miles per hour but put into lower range and it basically holds all the way down to about 2 miles or 1 mile per hour.... Now if you're looking for it to behave exactly like the stock secondary in regards E break then you better not switch but also don't complain about a clutch that will not back shift.... In other words if you want instant engine braking when dropping over a big cliff then you better be on the throttle slightly so the belt is engaged
If you want the engine braking that is very close to stock they do have it set up much better than it was before and it works awesome for my application which is sometimes damn near vertical all I do is make sure the belt stays engaged with the skinny pedal and in lower range and I have never been out of control going down hills with no brakes
To add to what Chris was saying about the one way bearing is true but with a NEW belt only.... The only problem is if you would call it a problem is that the smaller one way bearing that gives you better performance out of the hole does not grab the belt like the stock bearing... Therefore after a few runs when it tries to grab the belt it slips wearing the ribs down on the inside of the belt that's when you basically lose that function and just make sure the Machine rpm stays above engagement and like I said before you will have zero troubles mine basically on any hill as long as in low range I go down with no brakes. Hope this clarifys.... There are a few threads on this subject and one in particular where me and Chris battled back and forth but finally came to the realization that are terrain and theories on ebrake where different thats when they developed the new helix to work correct for us Mtn goat type people

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N900A using Tapatalk
What helix are you referring too? I have the Gen II with a 40* helix with EB......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,381 Posts
thanks....what altitude are you at? I ride around 3K ft and up.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top