Can-Am Maverick Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,066 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally picked up a Dynojet wideband o2 sensor to compliment my Dynojet PVCX programmer. Install was very easy, i already installed a M18 bung in my custom exhaust a couple weeks ago. I ran the wires behind the passenger seat and down into console and forward. One cable comes from the diagnostics port under the glovebox lid to the Wideband CX box. Another wire comes from the o2 sensor itself and you have to land the wires on the Wideband CX box. I found the rubber grommets inside where the wire poke through needed a little moving around with a pick to insert the wires easily. Next i ran the wire up to the gauge cluster and plugged it into the Dynojet PVCX programmer which is mounted with an awesome bracket.

At an idle with stock tune i was showing an AFR of 15.4. I cant wait until i get my Whalen Speed 180 tune all dialed in and running perfect. This Wideband CX will help fine tune my program by logging the AFR alone with other engine parameters the PVCX reads.

Cable Technology Electronic device Auto part Wire

Auto part Fuel line Engine Pipe Exhaust manifold

Wire Electronics Cable Electrical wiring Technology

Technology Electronics accessory Automotive battery Electronic device Wire

Road Nature Vegetation Atmospheric phenomenon Asphalt

Vehicle Motor vehicle Transport Mode of transport Car
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,153 Posts
bet it would not be that lean with stock intake and exhaust
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,100 Posts
Nice, I wouldn't worry about that one bit, all that really matters is reading at wot. Nice to have that right in front of you
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,066 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Seems like the PVCX is the way to go if you want to tune your own car!
Possibly, but I bought mine though Whalen Speed and have been working with John Whalen for a 91 octane tune with bigger injectors for my 17 XRS. It’s really nice to run my car and create logs and have a professional create a tune specific for my car and my driving style in the terrain I drive in. All the while being more than 1000 miles away from the professional tuner.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
705 Posts
Seems like the PVCX is the way to go if you want to tune your own car!
Agreed, but you need a tune that is not locked. You either pay a premium price if you can get a tuner to sell you one, or you start with a base stock tune, and go from there. Even the dynojet tunes are locked. I'm working on a evo big injector tune with 2018 fuel pump on my car.. It is time consuming though.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top