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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I was driving my Mav around and was thinking man this thing seems snappier and just like there's a little more pep in it. Then I remembered I had some 110 I had to use up from the race sled so I dumped a gallon or 2 in the Mav a week prior. So was this just in my head or did it actually do something? I'm not sure exactly how much I put it in and it was mixed with 93 but it was enough to smell it. Might be a dumb post but i was curious thanks
 

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U did 110 mph in the mav ? holy moly . nice
 

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Waste of money. The higher the the octane, the lower the power is in the fuel. The lower the octane, the higher the power is in the fuel. I always find it amazing how 99.9 percent of people have it backwards. I also find it amazing that those same people always "feel" more power when the use high octane, when in reality they lowered it. Always use what the manufacture recommends.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was under the assumption that it burned cleaner not more hp. The Mav feeling snappier is fact and I was thinking maybe it had something to do with fuel but I'm leaning towards all the ice melting out of it from winter.
 

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You mean increase detonation temperature. It's not just temperature though it's cylinder pressure too.

Higher octane fuel is more resistant to detonation, less volatile.
 

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Waste of money. The higher the the octane, the lower the power is in the fuel. The lower the octane, the higher the power is in the fuel. I always find it amazing how 99.9 percent of people have it backwards. I also find it amazing that those same people always "feel" more power when the use high octane, when in reality they lowered it. Always use what the manufacture recommends.
You are partly correct, it is a waste of money in a Maverick, but other than that you are incorrect. Octane is completely irrelevant to the amount of energy density in a fuel. Some higher octave fuels may produce more energy some less, as well some 87 octane fuels may produce more energy and some less. Energy density is measured in MJ/L or MJ/Kg, it's pretty easy to search for a given fuel, or any combustible product, to see what the actual stored energy amount is. Octane only effects the resistance to combustion. The more resistance the more compression may be applied before combustion, greater pressure creates more combustion energy and will also yield a more complete burn cycle for a higher volumetric efficiency (more power).

Energy density, also known as "stored energy", of pump gas may also vary by season and region due to various additives.

Aviation fuels (non jet) typically do have about 5% more stored energy than pump gas. Any pump gas with ethanol will yield less power and lower miles per gallon due to ethanol having a lower MJ/L than straight gasoline.

If you ran continually higher octane rated fuels in the Maverick you would, at some point, make less power due to a less complete burn (lower VE), irrespective of the energy density. Obviously there are lots of variables that effect what that octane rating would be. The Mav may make less power at 100 octane or maybe 105 or 110, but it doesn't make any difference as it won't make any more power without the added pressures and temperatures to take advantage of that fuel.
 

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If you were using crappy fuel and didn't know it the Mavs computer was probably cutting timing because of hitting deto sensor now with some good fuel mixed in no detonation and no timing retarding making more power.... Just a possibility
 

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You are partly correct, it is a waste of money in a Maverick, but other than that you are incorrect. Octane is completely irrelevant to the amount of energy density in a fuel. Some higher octave fuels may produce more energy some less, as well some 87 octane fuels may produce more energy and some less. Energy density is measured in MJ/L or MJ/Kg, it's pretty easy to search for a given fuel, or any combustible product, to see what the actual stored energy amount is. Octane only effects the resistance to combustion. The more resistance the more compression may be applied before combustion, greater pressure creates more combustion energy and will also yield a more complete burn cycle for a higher volumetric efficiency (more power).

Energy density, also known as "stored energy", of pump gas may also vary by season and region due to various additives.

Aviation fuels (non jet) typically do have about 5% more stored energy than pump gas. Any pump gas with ethanol will yield less power and lower miles per gallon due to ethanol having a lower MJ/L than straight gasoline.

If you ran continually higher octane rated fuels in the Maverick you would, at some point, make less power due to a less complete burn (lower VE), irrespective of the energy density. Obviously there are lots of variables that effect what that octane rating would be. The Mav may make less power at 100 octane or maybe 105 or 110, but it doesn't make any difference as it won't make any more power without the added pressures and temperatures to take advantage of that fuel.
Holy moly...Mr Chemical Engineer here. ;)
 

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Has no one realized the fact that a maverick has cats and o2 sensor. Most 110 octane fuel is leaded which will kill the cat and o2 sensors. I may be wrong here.
 
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I thought the Mavierick is programmed to run on 87. 110 is a waste unless you are running higher compression.
 

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I thought the Mavierick is programmed to run on 87. 110 is a waste unless you are running higher compression.
No,its set up to run on 91.
 

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You are partly correct, it is a waste of money in a Maverick, but other than that you are incorrect. Octane is completely irrelevant to the amount of energy density in a fuel. Some higher octave fuels may produce more energy some less, as well some 87 octane fuels may produce more energy and some less. Energy density is measured in MJ/L or MJ/Kg, it's pretty easy to search for a given fuel, or any combustible product, to see what the actual stored energy amount is. Octane only effects the resistance to combustion. The more resistance the more compression may be applied before combustion, greater pressure creates more combustion energy and will also yield a more complete burn cycle for a higher volumetric efficiency (more power).

Energy density, also known as "stored energy", of pump gas may also vary by season and region due to various additives.

Aviation fuels (non jet) typically do have about 5% more stored energy than pump gas. Any pump gas with ethanol will yield less power and lower miles per gallon due to ethanol having a lower MJ/L than straight gasoline.

If you ran continually higher octane rated fuels in the Maverick you would, at some point, make less power due to a less complete burn (lower VE), irrespective of the energy density. Obviously there are lots of variables that effect what that octane rating would be. The Mav may make less power at 100 octane or maybe 105 or 110, but it doesn't make any difference as it won't make any more power without the added pressures and temperatures to take advantage of that fuel.
Excellent explanation for us chemical engineering challenged peeps
 

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You are partly correct, it is a waste of money in a Maverick, but other than that you are incorrect. Octane is completely irrelevant to the amount of energy density in a fuel. Some higher octave fuels may produce more energy some less, as well some 87 octane fuels may produce more energy and some less. Energy density is measured in MJ/L or MJ/Kg, it's pretty easy to search for a given fuel, or any combustible product, to see what the actual stored energy amount is. Octane only effects the resistance to combustion. The more resistance the more compression may be applied before combustion, greater pressure creates more combustion energy and will also yield a more complete burn cycle for a higher volumetric efficiency (more power).

Energy density, also known as "stored energy", of pump gas may also vary by season and region due to various additives.

Aviation fuels (non jet) typically do have about 5% more stored energy than pump gas. Any pump gas with ethanol will yield less power and lower miles per gallon due to ethanol having a lower MJ/L than straight gasoline.

If you ran continually higher octane rated fuels in the Maverick you would, at some point, make less power due to a less complete burn (lower VE), irrespective of the energy density. Obviously there are lots of variables that effect what that octane rating would be. The Mav may make less power at 100 octane or maybe 105 or 110, but it doesn't make any difference as it won't make any more power without the added pressures and temperatures to take advantage of that fuel.

Don't believe everything you read.. I like the smell of a good 110 octane fuel myself,, that's gotta be worth some type of performance gain! :big smile:
 

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This is what I posted in the Commander forums to a guy who posed the same question.


In most computer controlled engines the ECU is set to 87 octane unless otherwise stated. Some vehicles require premium fuel and will be indicated in the owners manual. If the vehicle is designed for 87 octane then paying for a higher grade is a waste of money. The higher octane is not a cleaner or better fuel, or will make your engine run better, or give you more HP. It is a simple waste of money.

Most ECU's will not adjust for engine timing based on the octane of the fuel. Example, if you put 91 octane in a engine designed to run 87, the ECU will still recognize it as 87 and won't adjust for the 91. Again, the reason why it's a waste of money. Now on the flip side, if your engine is designed to run on 91 and you put 87 in it, you can have problems like lower HP and pinging. I seriously doubt that the Commander has a ECU will adjust for higher octane rating. Most 50 thousand dollars vehicles can't do that.

The Commander manual says a minimum octane level of 87, which is the recommended octane level, and is the value that is required. Therefore anything higher, and your just giving your money to the oil company. Now when someone cracks the Commander ECU and can change the value from 87 to 91, then and only then will there be a benefit.

Please understand that higher octane does not equal more power. Octane is merely resistance to preignition caused by higher compression or excessive temperature. Reg 87 octane has just as much energy as 91+ in todays computer managed vehicles. Any modern engine gets just as much power from regular as compared to the higher octanes, unless your engine specifically requires it. Higher octane is merely a marketing ploy to play on the ignorant.
Don't get me wrong. There are different quality's of fuel. Different brands have different additives that may be better for your engine. I'm strictly talking about the octane rating. If you buy Shell gasoline, and one pump says 87 and the other says 91, there is no difference in the quality of that gasoline, just the octane value. So yes, definitely use good quality fuel, just don't get hung up on the octane rating. It's just like oil. There are many 5w-30's out there spread out over different brands. Is one better than the other, yes, but the weight will still be 5w-30. Lower octane does not mean "cheaper" gas.

The octane rating of gasoline tells you how much the fuel can be compressed before it spontaneously ignites. When gas ignites by compression rather than because of the spark from the spark plug, it causes knocking in the engine. Knocking can damage an engine, so it is not something you want to have happening. Lower-octane gas (like "regular" 87-octane gasoline) can handle the least amount of compression before igniting.

The compression ratio of your engine determines the octane rating of the gas you must use in the car. One way to increase the HP of an engine of a given displacement is to increase its compression ratio. So a "high-performance engine" has a higher compression ratio and requires higher-octane fuel. The advantage of a high compression ratio is that it gives your engine a higher horsepower rating for a given engine weight -- that is what makes the engine "high performance." The disadvantage is that the gasoline for your engine costs more. In modern ECU controlled vehicles the computer will set the octane value in the computer to not allow any variances because of the engines compression.
 
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