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Bearings are pretty easy for a hour or 2 side project on the weekend. 19mm for the lugs, small screw driver for the caps (stock rims) needle nose for the cotter pin, 30mm for the castle nuts, and a 15mm wrench for the calipers, grease gun, and greaser.
Can honestly be done in 45 minutes once you get it down. You also get to inspect everything else when your under there and grease the other points.

Not sure why everyone doesn鈥檛 do their own wrenching. I look forward to it every weekend. My relaxation.

Dealership will never touch my buggy.

Wiggling the half ass version of checking, could be 4 other issues causing it.
Excellent information, thanks Sir! I found several good YouTube videos to go along with it:



My brandy new Max RS with less than 15 miles is sitting in my garage until I heal up and can start wrenching on and taking it out in the desert and this is at the top of the first of things to do before doing so!
 

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Geez.....not much in that brand new bearing!
Apparently not much in the new bearing from a different manufacture either. Cool video and I can see how some take a lot of pumps to fill it up. Most of the grease goes to fill that void before it hits the bearing balls. So how much extra grease is really getting to the right spot? I would guess maybe one pump of grease.

Still does not change my opinion. If you run in mud and water, definitely a good idea to grease them every once in a while. Dry environment not necessary, but if it makes you feel better go for it.
 

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Apparently not much in the new bearing from a different manufacture either. Cool video and I can see how some take a lot of pumps to fill it up. Most of the grease goes to fill that void before it hits the bearing balls. So how much extra grease is really getting to the right spot? I would guess maybe one pump of grease.

Still does not change my opinion. If you run in mud and water, definitely a good idea to grease them every once in a while. Dry environment not necessary, but if it makes you feel better go for it.
The grease can only go one place before coming out seals and that's where the bearings lay.
At 12-14 pumps before coming out the seal there isn't any other place it can go other than the cavity area surrounding the bearings which indicates it's not even close to being full.
 

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2020 Maverick X3 MAX XRS TURBO RR
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One guy that doesn't grease his bearings and runs in dry environment and says he's fine, everyone else greases their bearings and they are fine. Some people didn't grease their bearings and they failed.

No one will ever win this argument. Grease or don't grease, do whatever you want based on all the previous info provided. This thread needs to be closed 馃憤
 

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One guy that doesn't grease his bearings and runs in dry environment and says he's fine, everyone else greases their bearings and they are fine. Some people didn't grease their bearings and they failed.

No one will ever win this argument. Grease or don't grease, do whatever you want based on all the previous info provided. This thread needs to be closed 馃憤
Yup.
The video pretty much sums it up, leave them as is or service them.
 

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As the grease heats up, it will find its way to the ball bearings if its not already there.
Yes when a low amount heats up.
However if there are voids when sitting it can allow condensation/moisture into the bearing and race and we know what will eventually end up happening.
Premature failure.

 

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This argument amazes me. Seems like we've had this discussion before but I couldn't find the thread. I can understand the skepticism at greasing the bearings upon initial purchase. I had a hard time believing Can Am could install bearings due for early failure. Based on youtube videos and input from this forum, I went ahead and greased my bearings shortly after purchase. One of my bearings came apart while removing the hub. I didn't have to count the number of grease pumps on that bearing. It was evident the bearing had very little grease in it and was doomed for early failure. For anyone who thinks that's not a Can Am but third party issue, that's total BS. Can Am is ultimately responsible for their suppliers and grease is cheap.

Regardless, sealed bearings (maintenance free bearings) are designed to be replaced as opposed to maintained. Those aftermarket grease tools provide a means to significantly extend the life of these bearings and they're simple to use as opposed to replacing the bearing. To be clear, I'm not saying you're going to lose a hub on the trail after a thousand miles. Those bearings are pretty tough and will roll, albeit with increased resistance, without grease. But at a minimum, I would grease them at least once. That will extend the meantime between bearing failure and possibly beyond the life of your X3.
 
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Yes, always greasing them bearings



No need to remove the entire assembly to service them! Simply remove the axle nut & hub, slide the greasing tool over the axle and pump the bearings with grease! CNC made from billet aluminum, designed & manufactured in house at UTV INC in Mesa, Arizona. This will fit the FRONT & REAR wheel bearings on the Can Am Maverick X3 & X3 Max models.

LINK: UTV INC CAN AM MAVERICK X3 FRONT & REAR WHEEL BEARING GREASER TOOL
 

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I'm curious why they come with so little grease from the factory, Can Am has to have some reason for it other than saving 3c per vehicle on grease.

Someone in the past had said they were sealed bearings, and pumping all that grease in breaks the seal. More recently I read that it's actually a dust lip, which seems more correct. That should mean overdoing it on the grease is nbd and helps fill all that open space no?
You are only suppose to place 33% of volume in a bearing. The factory fills them to these specs. I am pretty darn sure these are just industrial bearings and CanAm used what was on the market, not special built for or by CanAm. The problem is the extremely rough life that these SxS's have, dirt,sand, water, speed. Keeping clean lube in the bearings are their life so, making sure you have fresh clean grease by pushing out the dirt is a good idea. I would say the main factor is the seals are not up to the task, they allow hot grease to escape and contaminates to get in.
 

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You are only suppose to place 33% of volume in a bearing. The factory fills them to these specs. I am pretty darn sure these are just industrial bearings and CanAm used what was on the market, not special built for or by CanAm. The problem is the extremely rough life that these SxS's have, dirt,sand, water, speed. Keeping clean lube in the bearings are their life so, making sure you have fresh clean grease by pushing out the dirt is a good idea. I would say the main factor is the seals are not up to the task, they allow hot grease to escape and contaminates to get in.
My understanding is some industrial bearing and especially electrical bearing yes.
Wheel bearings no due to the nature of the use and environment.
With only 33% will allow condensation and moisture to enter (especially with bad seals) which is one of the main culprits of premature wear.
 

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I just ordered the CaTech grease tool for my 2020 XRC RR. Been wanting it for a few weeks but was waiting on their quick detach front sway bar links to be back in stock to save on shipping.

My go-to grease for mtn bikes, motorcycles, and now this is Motorex 2000. It鈥檚 been great and I think the bright green color looks cool haha
 

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I finally got around to doing this yesterday. Since I needed to do the Fox Race suspension tune, install my 32s and take off the mud scrapers it was as good a time as any! I solved my lift issues (not having one!) by using the Time Trial exhaust air bag that I saw discussed on here previously. I'd note that I ended up lifting one side at a time, after several attempts to lift the front end only ended with it rolling off the bag as it doesn't go straight up...

I used the Alba greasing tool that I bought from Craig/ProUTV. I went VERY slow and stopped as soon as I saw any grease weeping. With that being said it took between 22-27 pumps. That wasn't surprising considering what other people here have said their machine took.

I'm very appreciative of the information in this thread, the only thing I'd add is the specific torque numbers:
  1. Brake caliper bolt (15mm): 35 lb/ft
  2. Axle nut (30mm): 184 +/- 11 lb/ft
  3. Wheel lugs (19mm): 89 +/- 7 lb/ft
I'm not sure if that makes me part of the cool kids club or not but I'm sure glad I did it.
 
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I do alot of my work, but not all. I have a great relationship with the local dealer and all of the guys in the shop. I also have another friend that has a utv performance shop. I am lucky to have these guys in my corner. If I dont have time to get something done before the next trip. These guys always come through and explain everything that they did to me.
 
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