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more throttle when launching off the jump! lol
 

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Small take off ramps don't give the suspension time to settle and end up extending with force in the air which rotates the car. In short no, you cannot adjust enough to no make it kick in the rear.

Now you could revalve the shock to reduce the kick but you will hate your car while going through woops.
 

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Can this be corrected with shock adjustments?thanks for any help.
Give Alex Reed a call from CT Racing, he will get you fixed up....
 

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Now you could revalve the shock to reduce the kick but you will hate your car while going through woops.
This is incorrect.
When we tested our rear revalve against a bone stock Maverick we could run 18-24" whoops at 65mph and the factory suspension could not make it over 50-55mph due to the rear end dancing around. We could have gone faster than 65mph if we had the power.

A revalve on the rear shocks will eliminate or reduce the bucking and keep the car way more planted in the whoops hands down.
Also a rule of thumb is the face of the jump has to be longer than the wheelbase and truly it needs to be about 2x the wheelbase of the vehicle. Other factors come into play as well but slowing down the rebound makes a big difference. All in all just about the perfect amount of rebound is jumping it onto a flat surface and it not bouncing up when its landing and the factory suspension is not capable of doing that, we've ran multiple test with the factory suspension and it's proven.

http://www.maverickforums.net/forum/41-ct-racing/2354-rear-shock-revalve.html
 

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I may be sending you my rears as well once I get my car back
 

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I played with mine this weekend. I had to add 12 clicks of rebound to the front and added some preload in the front. It made the front spring more so it didn't dive as bad. I don't think it is perfect but for the stock shocks it helped a lot.
 

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Try flipping the shocks, put the rear shocks on the front and the front shocks on the rear. The rear shock spring are arond 200lb per inch and the front about 160. If you flip them it will help with the heavier springs pushing the front down.This will help. The only real fix is new springs and revalving.
 

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Alex, what do you mean by the "face of the jump"?
The take off for a jump. I'll try to explain this where it makes sense.
So on a jump at the bottom when it starts to go up from level ground that would be the base of the jump, the top of the jump or the last place where your tires would touch before you go into the air would be the top of the jump. The area between the base and the top of the jump is what I call the face of the jump. The distance between the base and the top HAS to be longer than the wheelbase or it will buck you every time. If you can picture it, if the jump is shorter than the wheelbase, once the front tires go off they start to go down before the rear tires hit the top of the jump. It will buck you unless you have enough power to keep the front end up in the air before the rear hits and you can power through it like at very low speeds and full throttle.
We have a lot of drainage rollers out here that help with trail erosion and I've seen them at a lot of places on the east coast. Those are one of the biggest things to be careful of out here cause the dirt bikes and quads can jump them but the UTV's go end over end on them.
In some extreme cases the front rebound being too fast can cause the rear end to come up as well. Again a simple revalve on the rear shocks will greatly reduce it.
 

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The take off for a jump. I'll try to explain this where it makes sense.
So on a jump at the bottom when it starts to go up from level ground that would be the base of the jump, the top of the jump or the last place where your tires would touch before you go into the air would be the top of the jump. The area between the base and the top of the jump is what I call the face of the jump. The distance between the base and the top HAS to be longer than the wheelbase or it will buck you every time. If you can picture it, if the jump is shorter than the wheelbase, once the front tires go off they start to go down before the rear tires hit the top of the jump. It will buck you unless you have enough power to keep the front end up in the air before the rear hits and you can power through it like at very low speeds and full throttle.
We have a lot of drainage rollers out here that help with trail erosion and I've seen them at a lot of places on the east coast. Those are one of the biggest things to be careful of out here cause the dirt bikes and quads can jump them but the UTV's go end over end on them.
In some extreme cases the front rebound being too fast can cause the rear end to come up as well. Again a simple revalve on the rear shocks will greatly reduce it.
Ok, now I understand what you are saying. Thanks for clearing that up for me. Actually, I never thought about this point but good to know now.
 

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Someone is practicing their backflip!
 

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can you say "photoshop"
 

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wow...that would be cool to see....who is it?
 
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