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Anyone have good targets where the AIM gauge would be good to set at with the 2 stage colored alarms?

What thresholds temperature for the Yellow Warning level makes the most sense to know its time to ease off the skinny pedal a bit, and at what temperature should the blinking Red Alarm be triggered to help prohibit getting into a detrimental temperature to the integrity of the stock OEM 422280652 belt?

Anyone have settings they like, and helps keep you in a safe zone, as well as gives enough time to catch a warning if you are focused and concentrating on the path ahead of you intently, only making the occasional glance to check status?

Is there a goldilocks belt temperature zone belts "like" to operate in?

Not too Hot, not too Cold?

Does anyone wait to get a belt up to a certain temperature before harder pulls or hammering on it?

What would be good temperatures to avoid exceeding on the OEM belt?

Is there a steady temperature once you see the belt exceeding, its pretty much going to be done for once its ran that hard, and you can no longer rely on that belts integrity?

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How often are you guys seeing 170+..? I've never taken the x3 to dunes, and rarely see over 130f in the canyons or desert roads.. 100-110 on the trails. Couldn't get over 58f through October-November hunting rides.

Does reaching 170f regularly, shorten belt life drastically?
 
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Use this belt for those of you that are running over 200. Good for 300 f.

 

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How often are you guys seeing 170+..? I've never taken the x3 to dunes, and rarely see over 130f in the canyons or desert roads.. 100-110 on the trails. Couldn't get over 58f through October-November hunting rides.

Does reaching 170f regularly, shorten belt life drastically?
Every once in a while 170 while dunning but a hot day and long straight run to duners diner can hit 200. 170 does not seem to loose a belt. Tim
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
How often are you guys seeing 170+..? I've never taken the x3 to dunes, and rarely see over 130f in the canyons or desert roads.. 100-110 on the trails. Couldn't get over 58f through October-November hunting rides.

Does reaching 170f regularly, shorten belt life drastically?
Have read people here that say they get to 200*F commonly with reportedly no ill effects...but I would have to assume as the temperature rises, it has to be harder on the belt the longer it runs there?

But then again, maybe the material has an operational range where it is best suited to hooking up with the sheaves at certain elevated temperatures, and possibly slips less, gripping the smooth aluminum face, sort of like a "slick tire"?

Possibly a poor misplaced analogy that has no relevancy here, but thats why I am hoping someone that understands these can help explain this better! people commonly throw around numbers, rarely do they specify why.
With slick racing tires they need to get up to a base temperature or they can be like driving on ice when strait out on track.
Even as they warm the grip is only slowly increasing, but there are specific temperatures where once the carcass is fully up to temperature the compounds "bites" into the surface from that balance of dynamic friction and mechanically keying into the surface. Past that point, and again you loose grip and the tire degrades at an accelerated rate.

Taking a guess a belt might have similar properties, where they Want to be run in a specific range? Possibly warm enough to soften the compound of the belt, as well as the lateral grip from the sheave pressing against the sides maybe able to grab better at specific temperatures? When someone smokes their belt at high load like climbing, is low belt temperature ever a factor?

There also must be a point that once the belt has exceeded, degradation of the internal materials structure must break down at an elevated pace, the higher you go or the longer at those temperatures , the faster the breakdown occurs? Whether those are known for any specific belt, I don't know, but I bet the community has a pretty good idea where those points are just from empirical observation?

Many are utilizing the OEM stock 422280652 belt, so hopefully someone is willing to better define those windows of operation, there are some very well informed technical people here, as well as many with lots of CVT experience just from doing it for so long and what works best for them.
 

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Have read people here that say they get to 200*F commonly with reportedly no ill effects...but I would have to assume as the temperature rises, it has to be harder on the belt the longer it runs there?

But then again, maybe the material has an operational range where it is best suited to hooking up with the sheaves at certain elevated temperatures, and possibly slips less, gripping the smooth aluminum face, sort of like a "slick tire"?

Possibly a poor misplaced analogy that has no relevancy here, but thats why I am hoping someone that understands these can help explain this better! people commonly throw around numbers, rarely do they specify why.
With slick racing tires they need to get up to a base temperature or they can be like driving on ice when strait out on track.
Even as they warm the grip is only slowly increasing, but there are specific temperatures where once the carcass is fully up to temperature the compounds "bites" into the surface from that balance of dynamic friction and mechanically keying into the surface. Past that point, and again you loose grip and the tire degrades at an accelerated rate.

Taking a guess a belt might have similar properties, where they Want to be run in a specific range? Possibly warm enough to soften the compound of the belt, as well as the lateral grip from the sheave pressing against the sides maybe able to grab better at specific temperatures? When someone smokes their belt at high load like climbing, is low belt temperature ever a factor?

There also must be a point that once the belt has exceeded, degradation of the internal materials structure must break down at an elevated pace, the higher you go or the longer at those temperatures , the faster the breakdown occurs? Whether those are known for any specific belt, I don't know, but I bet the community has a pretty good idea where those points are just from empirical observation?

Many are utilizing the OEM stock 422280652 belt, so hopefully someone is willing to better define those windows of operation, there are some very well informed technical people here, as well as many with lots of CVT experience just from doing it for so long and what works best for them.
If your clutch is set up properly it should perform well up until replacement. Kind of like oil.
I wouldn't over think it.
 

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200ish gets my attention but I don’t see it very often. Anything up to that my foot is still in it😉.

Dont know why they don’t put low temp warning lights on these things?? IMO just as important. Romping on a cold brittle belt is one of the worst things you can do.

Everyone likes to focus on heat, but we have seen LOTS of belts let go at what I would call normal gettin-on-it temps ~170. It’s not always the heat that gets ya.
 

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Daaaaamn @HPnMORE4J just shut @rotarypower101 down...... Lol

I "know" rotary is on to something... It ain't rockit scientists.

The analogy of a warmed up drag slick/any tire you're trying to hook for that matter, seems plausible... CVT clutches are still unfamiliar to me, they don't know me very well.

I'll add, the only time I've had the smartcar x3 tell me to shift to low, was loading on the carhauler trailer on a cold snowy morning after a ride. Came back to the trailer, unloaded gear into the truck, and went to pull on to the trailer in High, 4x4... (4High sounds weird when talking about the carBike..) Belt temp that entire morning ranged around 60f-70f. So maybe a necessary heat range is established for optimal grippage, non-slippage, and clutch sheave wear.
 

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IMO, improper alignment, engagement and/or sheave issues causing improper wear that compromises belt integrity, then they blow when cool.

I've never seen a brand new belt blow when cool unless somehow the manufacturing was flawed which is extremely rare.
 

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I do wonder about the Can Am BTS vs an aftermarket sensor... Can Am states in their manual that it measures ambient air in the housing... Does the AIM sensor ultimately do the same thing..? If the belt is actually 140f but the CVT in pulling in -10f air, the sensor is just trying to pull as accurate reading as possible. And it would vary so much.

An infrared sensor directly at the belt would be ideal.. Iam just trusting the can am factory sensor, I guess it is placed just above where the belt would ride at WOT?

EDIT; better picture, still poor quality.
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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I do wonder about the Can Am BTS vs an aftermarket sensor... Can Am states in their manual that it measures ambient air in the housing... Does the AIM sensor ultimately do the same thing..? If the belt is actually 140f but the CVT in pulling in -10f air, the sensor is just trying to pull as accurate reading as possible. And it would vary so much.

An infrared sensor directly at the belt would be ideal.. Iam just trusting the can am factory sensor, I guess it is placed just above where the belt would ride at WOT?

EDIT; better picture, still poor quality.
View attachment 290150
If you want to know belt housing air temp, its great.

But have little concern for that, if idling its probably going to read a higher offset as it soaks the area with less flow, and when running hard in cold atmospheric condition reads low.

There is probably a noticeable latency as well, as the air temp measurement responds, the belt has already exceeded a threshold you know not to exceed.

If the difference between a happy belt and one on the edge of destruction is ~20*F , I want to know what the belt temperature is directly.
 
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