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another over priced option
when it malfunctions you need to take it to the stealer for repair
 
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No one yet has shown me a picture of the actual shock adjusters. I don't think there are any. If that's the case, you end up with 3 settings based on the factory setup. I would want 3 settings based on my own settings. In the videos I saw today, the cars looked like they were just about hitting the skid plate off of the jumps. I do know that there is still ride height adjustment to be had on the shocks. The parts manual is now online.
 

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No one yet has shown me a picture of the actual shock adjusters. I don't think there are any. If that's the case, you end up with 3 settings based on the factory setup. I would want 3 settings based on my own settings. In the videos I saw today, the cars looked like they were just about hitting the skid plate off of the jumps. I do know that there is still ride height adjustment to be had on the shocks. The parts manual is now online.
There aren’t any manual adjusters on the shock, just auto adjusters that replaced them. 3 settings plus the dynamic adjustments that are in between all three settings and bridge them together. Same as Polaris only much faster AND with rebound now so that’s awesome. The fox iQS system is three settings with no on the fly adjustments between the three in which case it may miss the mark on what ever you want it set too. The only way that you are going to adjust the dynamic shock system any better, short of ride night and cross over, is by sending them to shock therapy to be re-valved. If that car you saw in the video is set to sport + (full stiff on the button) with proper ride height, and still bottoms, then there’s nothing you can do to change it yourself other then getting springs and valving. If you have one specific set up that you like then save the 2000 cause this options useless to you then.


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I dont see the issue with " just about to hit the skid plate "

It used the travel it had. Assuming there is even some " dynamic" adjustment made by the computer then different hits will encounter different valving as it travels through its stroke depending on speed or inertia etc.

Point is that it's likley reacting to the situation and allowing the shocks to use the stroke available.

It almost sounds like some guys think the thing is not changing the valving as it encounters variables. I think that's why it has 9 sensors and makes calculations in milliseconds.
JMHO.

Tim
 

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I'm not sure how it works, but it sounds like instead of a valving adjustment you can just get a shock ecu tune and you're set to go. I wouldn't be surprised if shock tuners can send you a tune and instead of moving knobs for new terrain they just reprogram that switch and the valving to whatever presets you want, or give you the ability through a handheld device to change it yourself.

Why this technology has just recently started coming around is beyond me, it was the obvious evolution of shocks. Bypasses were the fanciest thing and essentially the same since 20 years ago, I think this has tons of potential.
 

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It almost sounds like some guys think the thing is not changing the valving as it encounters variables. I think that's why it has 9 sensors and makes calculations in milliseconds.
Electronic shocks do not change the piston valving. All they do is change the "clickers" on the fly.
 
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I'm not sure how it works, but it sounds like instead of a valving adjustment you can just get a shock ecu tune and you're set to go. I wouldn't be surprised if shock tuners can send you a tune and instead of moving knobs for new terrain they just reprogram that switch and the valving to whatever presets you want, or give you the ability through a handheld device to change it yourself.

Why this technology has just recently started coming around is beyond me, it was the obvious evolution of shocks. Bypasses were the fanciest thing and essentially the same since 20 years ago, I think this has tons of potential.
Yes, it may be possible to reprogram the shock ECU, but the tune is still limited to what the internal ports can flow.

Yes, it has been obvious for decades that this was the next step in shock evolution.
The reason it didn't happen sooner is that solenoids did not have a fast enough reaction time.
Apparently now they do.

I believe these shocks are still the same bypass shocks internally, maybe with different valving.
 

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Electronic shocks do not change the piston valving. All they do is change the "clickers" on the fly.
That's Symantec's. Clearly the clicker changes the rate at which fluid bypasses the valving.

The clicker therefore changed the rate at which the shock is dampened. Would me having changed the "term" changed the overall point?

Tim
 
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That's Symantec's. Clearly the clicker changes the rate at which fluid bypasses the valving.
The clicker therefore changed the rate at which the shock is dampened. Would me having changed the "term" changed the overall point?
The clickers (HSC LSC) do not have a bypass effect on the piston valving. All they do is control the orifice size between the shock body and the reservoir, which provides an additional damping effect. The LSC is just an orifice with a needle and seat, which can be closed shut. The HSC is an orifice with valve shims. The adjuster changes the preload on the shims, which determines when the shims will flow. This adjuster can not be closed totally. Some oil must be able to enter the reservoir or else the shock will hydraulically lock.
These two paths are parallel and only flow as much oil as the shaft displaces, as long as proper nitrogen pressure is maintained.

The REB clicker is a needle and seat which allows oil to flow in both compression and rebound. This adjuster is a two way bleed which in effect does bypass the piston, but the flow is relatively low. When the REB is closed, all of the oil is forced to flow through the piston and valving.
 

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The clickers (HSC LSC) do not have a bypass effect on the piston valving. All they do is control the orifice size between the shock body and the reservoir, which provides an additional damping effect. The LSC is just an orifice with a needle and seat, which can be closed shut. The HSC is an orifice with valve shims. The adjuster changes the preload on the shims, which determines when the shims will flow. This adjuster can not be closed totally. Some oil must be able to enter the reservoir or else the shock will hydraulically lock.
These two paths are parallel and only flow as much oil as the shaft displaces, as long as proper hydrogen pressure is maintained.

The REB clicker is a needle and seat which allows oil to flow in both compression and rebound. This adjuster is a two way bleed which in effect does bypass the piston, but the flow is relatively low. When the REB is closed, all of the oil is forced to flow through the piston and valving.
Electronic shocks do not have Hydrogen. They have "Nitrogen",

Hydrogen is VERY flammable gas and would be quite dangerous in a shock application. Tim
 
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another issue is going to be the electrical system and feedback from radios and other devices interfering with each other and not enough power to go around for the "Bro" stereo systems. .
 

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I'm curious how much a change in tire size or aftermarket springs would affect the smart shox sensors. I imagine it's programmed to work with stock 30" bighorns and stock springs... Many of us go straight to 32s and aftermarket springs have different rates!
 

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I'm curious how much a change in tire size or aftermarket springs would affect the smart shox sensors. I imagine it's programmed to work with stock 30" bighorns and stock springs... Many of us go straight to 32s and aftermarket springs have different rates!
I don't believe it will change anything. the sensor arms appear to only sense arm movement speed then translate that into how to adjust the shock. Anti dive and body roll don't care about car height.
 

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Until the body valving changes as well I'm not buying. I want a $10,000 shock system on a $30,000 car. Then i'll complain about the noise. lol

But if the shox are able to help adjust for the added unsprung weight, great. If they require a reporgram from the dealer to change tires, not good, if, nothing is known yet.
 

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I don't believe it will change anything. the sensor arms appear to only sense arm movement speed then translate that into how to adjust the shock. Anti dive and body roll don't care about car height.

Inertia will be quite different with heavier tires.

The same speed will not contain the same amount of energy with a heavier load traveling through the stroke.

The heavier will generate more force with a given speed.

I don't see how that will NOT affect the performance, whether that is negligible or not I have no way to know.

Tim
 
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^^ That's what I'm talking about. "Works fantastic on BH's" But sucks with Terrabites? Is a possibility
 

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Yes, it may be possible to reprogram the shock ECU, but the tune is still limited to what the internal ports can flow.

Yes, it has been obvious for decades that this was the next step in shock evolution.
The reason it didn't happen sooner is that solenoids did not have a fast enough reaction time.
Apparently now they do.

I believe these shocks are still the same bypass shocks internally, maybe with different valving.
You are correct it is the same internal bypass shock we have now on our X3, but with solenoids instead manual adjusters. The technology has been around for a long time and used in road racing applications. I know Rob Mac and a few others have been using electronic shocks in off-road racing for a while. The cool thing with the Can Am set up is it now includes rebound. This should make for a better reacting system.

The shock tuners as of now still have not cracked into the Polaris system. They have tried to make valving changes, but the have no real effect as the computer program adjust. This is why you only see spring packages for the Polaris set up right now. Which make an improvement in ride quality as the spring rates are correct and you get a true dual rate.

I think the Can Am system will be the same with maybe just a spring change needed to get the ride quality better.

King shocks and Walker Evans also have electronically controlled shocks. At the Sand Show King had theirs on display. The King set up was going to be like the Can Am and Polaris set up where it could adjust shocks to help with anti-dive and bodyroll.
 

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Inertia will be quite different with heavier tires.

The same speed will not contain the same amount of energy with a heavier load traveling through the stroke.

The heavier will generate more force with a given speed.

I don't see how that will NOT affect the performance, whether that is negligible or not I have no way to know.

Tim
The computer will adjust as it is measuring the movement via sensors. I would bet going to a 32" tire will not effect the reaction of the system or the ride quality in a negative way.
 
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