Dealer suspension settings, general all around settings?
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Dealer suspension settings, general all around settings?

This is a discussion on Dealer suspension settings, general all around settings? within the Maverick R forums, part of the Can-Am Maverick Forums category; I plan on riding lost trails in pa and a few places like that, can anyone recommend suspension settings or should i just leave as ...

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Thread: Dealer suspension settings, general all around settings?

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    Senior Member MKx3's Avatar
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    Dealer suspension settings, general all around settings?

    I plan on riding lost trails in pa and a few places like that, can anyone recommend suspension settings or should i just leave as set by dealer or at least check how the dealer set up?

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    Hollywood X3's Avatar
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    At a minimum, you should be at 15" ground clearance. There are plenty of threads to check set up. Check Ed Poundsand's thread. Long read, but very informative. If you try to tackle this by yourself, have a friend help. Easier for 2 guys to turn the springs. You also need to have your car off the ground when you do. There are YouTube videos too.
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    Senior Member kevin retread's Avatar
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    What model do you have?

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    Senior Member MKx3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevin retread View Post
    what model do you have?
    2019 x ds

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    Maybe look up the fox rec. setting , I set my car up with their raceing rec and it was pretty close to where im at now its a great place to start they have a trail set up also
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    Senior Member MKx3's Avatar
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    Didnt find fox Trail setting yet but I did find this :
    Tuning for Conditions

    Hard Pack Conditions
    Generally adjust compression damping as soft as possible, to handle square edges while still having some control with bottoming.
    Loamy Conditions
    Adjust damping a little firmer for the loamy terrain, jump faces and bottoming. Optimum settings still should be on the softer side for square edges and rutted corners.
    Sandy Conditions
    Adjust damping towards the firmer side... increase your fork compression and increase your shocks rebound. In general, two (2) clicks each. You want the bike to ride on top of the terrain, allowing the forks to ride up a little higher.
    Rocks and Roots Conditions
    Adjust compression more towards the soft side of your baseline settings; this helps to absorb the small sharp hits. You can also speed up rebound both front and rear; this adjustment helps wheels react quickly from rock to rock. This will also produce a very soft plush feel and help reduce arm pump/fatigue. This type of setting is good for woods or trail riding, however it will not be firm enough for fast MX track conditions; the bike will have a wallowy feeling, and will have bottom out issues in woops and jumps.
    Not using full travel, feels harsh, poor traction while making turns

    Causes
    Overly stiff springs or compression damping

    Solutions
    Reduce compression damping; softer coil springs
    Bottoms, soft throughout travel

    Causes
    Spring rate too low throughout travel, or too little compression damping
    Solutions
    Increase compression damping; stiffer Coils Springs
    Excessive sag, feels soft initially

    Causes
    Initial preload too low
    Solutions
    Increase spring preload
    Harsh over small bumps but uses full travel

    Causes
    Initial spring rate or preload too high, too much compression damping
    Solutions
    Install softer springs; reduce compression damping; reduce spring preload
    Takes first bump in a series well but harsh over later bumps, poor traction in washboard corners

    Causes

    Too much rebound damping
    Solutions
    Reduce rebound damping.
    Too Much Compression

    Symptom
    Ride is harsh, but not as bad as too much rebound. As speed increases, so does harshness. Rear end will want to kick up when going over medium to large bumps (shock resist movement even on medium size bumps)
    Solutions
    Decrease compression until harshness is gone
    Tip
    To learn what damping can do for your ride, experiment with the compression adjustments and rebound adjustments. We suggest you start with compression damping. Turn the compression adjuster to full firm, ride your bike for a while, and then turn the adjuster to full soft. This will give you an idea what compression damping can do. Likewise do the same with your rebound adjusters; feel what fast rebound is like, feel what slow rebound is like
    Wheel chatters over small bumps during braking or downhills

    Causes
    Too much preload, causing suspension to top out; possibly too much compression damping
    Solutions
    Reduce preload, decrease compression
    Front end springs back too quickly after bumps, poor traction in bumpy corners

    Causes
    Not enough rebound damping
    Solutions
    Increase rebound damping
    Rear Tuning tips

    Tips
    Compression damping, rebound damping. The spring preload sets the ride height of the vehicle, and determines how much of the total travel will be available for compression and how much will be available for extension. Damping keeps the vehicle from behaving like an old sacked-out Cadillac; i.e., still bouncing 10 seconds after hitting a bump. Compression damping slows the shock when it is being compressed. Rebound damping slows the shock when it is rebounding.
    Not using full travel, feels harsh, poor corning and braking traction

    Tips
    An overly stiff spring rate or compression damping; possibly too much preload
    Rear shock Lack of Compression

    Causes
    The rear suspension will feel too active (wallow excessively). On jump landings, the shock bottoms too easily.
    Solutions

    Increase the compression "gradually until the balance/feel is optimized". You will notice better bottom out control, and the wallow symptom will go away.

    FOX glossary of terms


    Coil Spring
    Consists of a metal wire formed into a coil which can store energy when compressed, and releases energy as the load is relieved.
    Compression Damping
    The damping circuit that absorbs the energy of compression forces on the damper.
    Damper
    A fluid chamber with a means of regulating the fluid flow, to govern the speed of the moving end of the damper during compression or rebound strokes.

    Damper Speed
    The relative speed in which the moving end of a damper compresses or rebounds.
    Damping
    The process of absorbing the energy of impacts transmitted through the fork or rear shock on the compression stroke, and the process of absorbing the energy of the spring on the rebound stroke.
    Damping Circuits
    There are normally four damping circuits which affect the damper's speed. There is both a low and high speed circuit for the compression and rebound strokes.
    HSC
    High Speed Compression damping is the damping circuit in the shock absorber or suspension fork that is tuned to provide suspension travel control at high speed over square edged bumps. All Fox products are HSC tuned by extensive lab and field testing. Too low of HSC damping will cause excessive bottoming out in rough terrain. Too high of HSC damping will minimize suspension travel in rough terrain and cause loss of traction.

    LSC
    Low Speed Compression damping is the damping circuit in the shock absorber or suspension fork that is tuned to provide suspension travel control at low damper speed conditions. All Fox products are LSC tuned by extensive lab and field testing. Too low of LSC damping will cause the excessive travel use, brake dive and wallowing of the bike on small bump terrain. Too high of LSC damping will cause loss of traction on small bump terrain.
    Suspension packing
    A term used to describe the ride characteristics of a rear shock or fork that has too slow of a rebound setting. A damper with to slow of a rebound setting will stay compressed after hitting one bump and cannot rebound quickly enough to absorb the impact of the second or third bump. The solution is to adjust the rebound to a faster setting.
    Preload
    Preload is applied to the fork and shock springs in order to bring the bike to the proper SAG dimension. Adjusting preload to the proper SAG dimension insures traction as wheel load gets light and drops into bumpy holed sections of terrain.
    Rebound Damping
    The damping circuit that controls the stored energy release of the compressed spring, in order to reduce the rebounding speed of the damper.
    SAG
    To sink, droop, or settle from pressure or weight
    Valve Shim
    A thin, spring steel flat washer used to exert resistance on the oil flow through a piston. A series of valve shims (valve stack or valving) with varying outer diameters and thicknesses are arranged in sequence to provide a particular damping effect.
    SLT (Scraper Lip Technology) Oil Seals
    Patented scraper lip technology excludes outside dirt and retains internal fork oil. The rubber in the seal is specially compounded for extremely low friction and wear.
    Spring Rate
    Spring rate is described by force, in pounds or kilograms, needed to compress the spring one inch or centimeter.
    Stiction
    A combination of the words static and friction. This word is used to describe the tension exerted on the moving damper parts by the stationary parts like the bushings, seals, and wipers. Low stiction is more desirable, because it has less of a negative effect on the damping.

    Un-sprung/Sprung Weight
    The un-sprung weight of the motorcycle are parts like the wheels, brakes, swingarm and suspension linkage, and the lower front fork legs. The sprung weight is the sum weight of all the parts of the motorcycle that are supported by the suspension.
    Last edited by MKx3; 03-25-2019 at 12:47 PM.

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    I believe this is the trail settings. https://www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.p...ips&v=Maverick
    Life doesent get much better than eating taco’s down at scorpian bay ,baja sur
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    Senior Member MKx3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desertdog01 View Post
    I believe this is the trail settings. https://www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.p...ips&v=Maverick
    I checked that, for X DS the values are the same, not sure about RS or STD

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    Senior Member MKx3's Avatar
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    ok, looked at youtube and other things, and pretty intimidated about this, i did the rebound low & hi compression, i then tried putting the tool on the nut to loosen the ring and couldnt budge it AT ALL. Anyone have any helpful tips? wd-40 or maybe put a 2ft pipe on the tool? - For front cant do that on the rear!

    Also im a little nervous about how tight to tighten up if i even get it lose, dont want to over tighten and ........

    appreciate the help especially if its like trying to teach an idiot cause thats about my skill level.

    Oh yeah ive seen different ways to do spring, space from top or spring length, on the space from top have seen a few different numbers and dont even know if it was for x ds or not so input on that would be helpful.

    I dont think i would feel that comfortable trying to do the springs while its on a jack, even if stands are underneath. Was thinking about using ratchet straps
    Last edited by MKx3; 03-31-2019 at 01:27 PM.

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    Senior Member IBjammin's Avatar
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    use a hammer and a large screwdriver or punch to knock the preload rings loose the spanner tool they give you is useless....

    using straps to compress the springs makes it a lot easier to adjust the preload! The recommended spring length is to get you close don't be afraid of adjusting beyond that to get your ride height where you want it...

    The dealer does not adjust the suspension there shipped low to meet a federal requirement for body roll that and the stock springs sag with use you will have to readjust to compensate for the sag once in a while.

    You have to get the shocks fully extended to adjust preload do one end at a time jack it up and put some jack stands under chassis to stabilize it you should be fine if you don't feel safe doing it get a buddy to help? before you tighten everything up drop the car on the ground roll it forward and backwards or drive it around for a minute to get it down to ride height check it a readjust if necessary once your happy tighten down the lock rings.
    Last edited by IBjammin; 03-31-2019 at 03:04 PM.
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